You cannot copy content of this page
astroligion.com » Blog Archives

Tag Archives: cognitive functions

mbti list Myers Briggs

The Cognitive Blind Spots of Each MBTI Type

Published by:

mbti blindspot

In the MBTI, blind-spots in your personality type are the areas you tend to overlook and fail to give adequate consideration for. Here’s a look at what your blank spot is based on Myers-Briggs personality type.

INFP

The General blind-spot associated with INFP, revolves around their lack of objectivity, attentiveness to details and being efficient with their time and energy. INFPs prefer to draw from the wellspring of their intuition and exercise their creativity rather than simply follow steps and prescriptions. INFPs have a strong desire to do things their way and consequently can fail to appreciate the necessity of certain rules and procedures. In managing their own lives, INFPs may suffer problems stemming from a lack of strong structure and planning things out effectively. Although they deep down would like to be more orderly, INFPs may need help from a more organized personality to help them optimize their lives and be more efficient.

INFJ

The blind spot for INFJ revolves around their lack of Se awareness and ability to improvise well under pressure and without adequate preparation. INFJs tend to be more cautious and tentative when undertaking a new task or project. INFJs think long term and like to work out the logistics of what they intend to do in their heads well in advance of taking action on any of it. Furthermore, INFJs may have a tendency to read too much into the future significance or meaning of objects in their environment and overlook the obvious, practical and immediate utility of that object. Generally speaking, because INFJs have such a strong focus on the future implications, they may often overlook the missed opportunities that are right in front of them or excellent options that can be implemented in the here and now.

ENFP

The blind spot for ENFPs will generally be with regards to keeping up with their responsibilities and their tendency to overlook logistical details when they are blinded by idealistic optimism. ENFPs seek to move forward and explore new possibilities and opportunities and they can’t stand to be held back by what they consider to be unnecessary restrictions, routines and over-adherence to convention and convenience. Because of this, they can sometimes miss out on the importance or value of conventional wisdom which can sometimes save them from unnecessary and preventable problems. Having an ISTJ around could help the ENFP by counterbalancing their pie-in-the-sky perspective with a more grounded, practical and responsible outlook.

ENFJ

The blind spot for ENFJs is generally their lack of ability for figuring out how to operate technical or mechanical objects and understanding how they work. ENFJs are more adept at grasping concepts that are explained to them but when it comes to hands on learning and figuring things out on the Fly, they can get tripped up frustrated by it. There is a lot of value in spending a lot of time by yourself and mastering a tool or instrument or craft of some sort. But because ENFJs are more people-oriented, they tend not to subject themselves to this type of isolated and intensive self-development. Furthermore, the ENFJ may also have difficulty recognizing nuanced distinctions between physical objects and have a tendency to overgeneralize.

INTP

The blind spot for INTP is primarily social in nature, especially within the realm of their personal relationships. For INTPs, the intellect is a safe zone for them where they like to spend a great deal of time. Consequently, they are often oblivious as to what’s going on with the people in their lives and how they are affected by INTP’s behaviors such as their tendency to isolate and skip out on opportunities to spend time together. INTP can have difficulty understanding other people’s perspectives and often take for granted that other people can understand the logic in how they operate. In reality, it is not so obvious to other people and they may often have different needs that INTP can easily overlook or fail to recognize as important.

INTJ

The blind spot for INTJ is being alert and responsive to their immediate environment. INTJs tend to live in the world of impressions and images within the private sanctum of their mind. They are good at visualizing the future and sussing out abstract ideas, but when it comes to physical details in their immediate environment, they can be largely unaware of what’s in front of them. The instincts of an INTJ can be largely unreliable when it comes to navigating the physical realm. Like INFJ, INTJs tend to focus on the long-term and overlook what’s going on in the present which can lead to missed opportunities and thrilling moments.

ENTP

The general blind-spot for ENTPs is attention to details and also awareness of their own internal bodily sensation. With their inferior Si, ENTPs are inclined to have a poor sense of what they are experiencing internally. They are not great at gauging the signals and messages that their body tries to send them. They may often pay too little or too much attention to their health. They may have a very libertine and casual disregard for their own health that borders on self-destructive. Because of the nervous energy they often have, ENTPs may often self medicate with various mind-altering cough cough substances. Listening to what their body tells them along with paying heed to the virtues and utility of convention, are a couple of the things that ENTP is prone to overlook.

ENTJ

The blind spot of the ENTJ is cultivating a healthy awareness of their own values and feelings as well as those of others. ENTJs tend to be consumed with a focus on goals and leveraging their time and energy on the logistics and resources needed to achieve those goals. The significance of “right and wrong” play a much lesser part in the ENTJ’s machinations. ENTJs tend to overlook the significance of what they feel and often view it as a form of weakness that just complicates matters distracting them from what needs to be done. For this reason ENTJs can unwittingly trample on the feelings of others and lack the self-awareness necessary for softening their forceful nature with more sensitivity and consideration.

ISTJ

The blind spot for ISTJ centers around their lack of flexibility and openness to risk and novelty. ISTJs tend to cling to what is familiar and true to them while actively avoiding and closing themselves off to experimental ideas and possibilities that require them to venture outside their comfort zone. Furthermore, with their inferior Si, ISTJs are not apt to jump on the bandwagon or be earlier adopters of new technologies, and innovative changes. For this reason, they can be a bit old-fashioned and out of the loop in comparison to their peers and society at large. Although they may be content with keeping things the way they are, ISTJ can miss out on a lot a new and exciting things that can enrich and expand their horizons.

ISFJ

The blind spot for ISFJ lies in their lack of interest or openness to new ideas, possibilities and concepts. ISFJs don’t really care to understand the nuts and bolts of everything. For them, what is more valuable and meaningful is their relationships and the roles they play within the context of their community society or vocation. ISFJs are very service-oriented and are more concerned with that which is real and concrete. They love having a set routine that they can carry-out day in and day out and it is not really in their nature to try and deviate from that. When the conventional way of doing things doesn’t work, ISFJs are inclined to get frustrated and feel helpless. Having an extroverted intuiter like ENTP can be helpful to the ISFJ in troubleshooting and figuring out all the possible reasons for why something doesn’t work and also generating a creative solution to a familiar problem.

ESTJ

The blind spot for the ESTJ is interpersonal sensitivity. With their inferior Fi, ESTJs are often not deeply in touch with their personal sense of values and sense of right and wrong. ESTJs are very objective oriented but they often have a great sense of humor and can be very exciting to be around. At the same time, they can also be very cutting and heavy-handed in how they dispense criticism and disapproval. ESTJ may lack awareness for how that comes across to others and why they should take the time to reflect and introspect on their own personal values. Furthermore, because of their lack of emotional self-awareness, ESTJs may have a lot of pent-up rage that spills out when they are triggered. A lot of this can be prevented if they are willing to explore their feelings and deal with them constructively rather than try to bury them beneath a layer of logic.

ESFJ

The blind spot for ESFJ is generally with regards to they’re inferior Ti. ESFJs are very strong in the interpersonal department, but not so much in the impersonal logical department. They may display a lot of logical inconsistency that stems from their efforts to appease others and keep the harmony on a instance by instance basis rather than address the core problem. ESFJs tend not to be very objective and are willing to bend or change their values to serve their purposes or the purposes of the group. ESFJs tend not to develop a strong set of personal principles and values of their own but rather base their values or orient themselves according to the values of the groups they operate within. To this regard they’re good rule-followers but when it comes to deliberating complicated issues and solving problems ESFJs can be lacking in their ability to work out a genuinely fair and objective solution. Such a solution would require a deeper critical thinking skills, and lateral thinking skills, each of which are the domain of the INTP and ENTP.

ISFP

Generally, the blind spot for ISFP lies in the area of preparation and efficiency. ISFPs are more free flowing in their approach to most tasks. They don’t deliberate too much before getting started and their working style tends to go in casual fits and spurts rather than a steady consistent effort. ISFPs may struggle when it comes to planning things out and devising a workable strategy that they will stick to. It is all too easy for them to break away from their plans and do something else or get sidetracked by some random event. Furthermore, ISFPs can also struggle in the area of responsibilities and fulfilling their duties and routine tasks. The lack of organization can be a big blind spot for ISFP for whom it may not seem like a big deal. they can tolerate quite a bit of disarray before they are compelled to straighten up and make their environment more tidy. It may take the influence of an ENTJ type to help the ISFP learn some organizational discipline and time management skills.

ISTP

The blind spot for the ISTP is primarily in the area of foresight and interpersonal relationships. ISTPs are very present-focused and do not spend a great deal of energy, time or thought on the consequences of their actions before they do them. ISTPs are game to deal with the aftermath, whatever that may be, but sometimes this attitude can result in consequences they can’t afford to deal with. Additionally, ISTPs grapple with much of the same social issues that INTPs deal with including obliviousness to the feelings of others and isolating themselves too much. ISTPs may not realize the damage they sometimes cause with their anger, blunt words and emotional unavailability. It may take some effort on their part to develop more emotional awareness and communicate their feelings more constructively.

ESFP

The blind spot for the ESFP is typically with regards to unrealistic expectations for the future. ESFPs in general tend to focus on the present and this can lead them to make myopic choices that come back to haunt them. Furthermore, as extroverts who live in the moment, ESFPs often lack a sense of self-awareness about themselves that is necessary for assessing their own actions and behaviors in order to self-improve. It is often incumbent upon others to inform them and give them a wake-up call to help them gain some perspective. Furthermore, ESFPs can have a sometimes negative attitude about the future because they want to stay young forever. Consequently, they may neglect to plan adequately and make smarter decisions in the present that will pay off down the road. The influence of and INTJ can help the ESFP avoid making some bad mistakes in pursuit of instant gratification.

ESTP

The blind spot for ESTP typically centers around long-term decision making. ESTPs are great at seizing opportunities and capturing the moment but many of their impulses drive them to seek instant reward and short-term benefits. This mindset allows them to remain undistracted by excessive fear about the what-ifs and potential pitfalls that could cause them to lose their nerve. The adrenaline often carries them away on the path to claim what they desire. However, when it comes to the long-term game, ESTPs may find that their decisions are not ideal or well-thought-out. Furthermore, ESTPs can also be less than attentive and present when it comes to emotional intimacy and quality time with their loved ones. For this reason, they can often be oblivious when it comes to providing what their loved ones need from them which may often be just emotional availability and affection.

related posts:

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 980 other subscribers

  • mbti list Myers Briggs

    How Each MBTI Type Uses Extraverted Feeling

    Published by:

    mbti extraverted feeling

    In the Myers-Briggs, extraverted feeling is a cognitive function described as having a focus on harmony, communication and connection with other people. Only 8 of the 16 MBTI types have Fe in their main 4-function stack. The others have it as a shadow function. Here is a look at how extroverted feeling is manifested and utilized by each MBTI personality type. Continue reading

    Subscribe to Blog via Email

    Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 980 other subscribers

  • article INTP ISTP Myers Briggs Reblogged

    INTP/ISTP Inferior Fe Subtypes | mbti-info

    Published by:

    via deviantart

    INFERIOR FE SUBTYPES

    mbti-info:

    1) the confidently eccentric inferior Fe: You maybe used to care what people think about you, but you don’t anymore. And even if you did, they probably wouldn’t like you anyway. You might as well be as weird as you want. Social skills- why bother.

    2) the quintessential nerd/gamer/goth/anime freak/computer geek: A lot of people consider themselves to be these things, but for you it’s an identity and a way of fitting in to compensate for not being able to fit in with normal people. You’ve found your niche, and you see no need to get out of your comfort zone. Social skills? I’ll socialize with people like me.

    3) the sociopath: Fe? Fi? Who needs feeling? Feeling is for the weak. Morals and ethics are completely irrelevant. All I need is cold, calculated logic, and with it I will rule the world.

    4) the brainiac philosopher: Knowledge is everything. Thinking is your hobby. You have an argument for everything, and will argue with anyone at any time over anything at all. You will frequently play the devil’s advocate and even argue something you don’t believe just to be a smart ass. Social skills are irrelevant, since most people aren’t intelligent enough to have a conversation with anyway. It’s not that you use Fe inappropriately perse, you just kind of ignore it in favor of thinking about how smart you are. Now if only you could take to heart what Socrates said about the wise man knowing that he knows nothing…

    5) the stalker inferior Fe: Inside you don’t really think anyone should like you, and you’ve probably had no friends for most of your life. So if someone shows any interest in you, you latch onto them like a leech. They are your New Best Friend or your love obsession. You secretly crave attention and human connection so much that it’s like a drug, and you think if this person were to leave you, you wouldn’t find anyone else who likes you for a long time; so this person must be special, since they actually pay attention to you. Try raising your self esteem, and getting out of your comfort zone to develop some social skills.

    6) the emotional inferior Fe: You are very concerned with what people think of you, and are sensitive to rejection. In fact, you are sensitive to a lot of things. You don’t really know how to deal with emotions, and they burst out of you inappropriately. You often get mistaken for a feeling type. You really want people to like you. You’re trying to develop social skills, but you overcompensate.

    7) the righteously indignant inferior Fe: You’ve been treated unfairly, and you’re going to say something about it. So have your peers, and you will defend them. In fact, you are a member of several oppressed minorities. You see it as your job to fight societal injustice and live as uniquely as you want. You are very rebellious and argumentative, and kind of naively idealistic. You also sometimes get mistaken for a feeling type. You have developed Fe in service to your beliefs, but your social skills are variable.

    8) the pothead: I dunno, man. It’s all good. Life is mysterious and complex. Take it easy. Get laid. Your Fe doesn’t really cause you problems, but you’ve kind of dulled your Ti with all the pot you’ve smoked. Which can turn out to be a good thing, because you’ve learned to relax and not over think everything. You actually seem human. You probably have excellent social skills.

    9) the cute and perky inferior Fe: You happen to have a charming personality and a great sense of humor. You like people, and want to be popular. You are mostly cute because of your lack of social skills. Maybe when you were younger people used to make fun of you, but you would always just laugh along with them, and pretty soon they liked you. When you make a social blunder, you do it in a cute and funny way. After all, taking life seriously leads to suffering. Occasionally you are mistaken for an extrovert, even though you might actually be very shy. Most people like you.

    10) the healthy and functional, well developed inferior Fe: You have learned how to develop your Fe over the years. You can convince most people that you are actually normal. You have a lot of friends, and most people like you. You’ve learned how to balance your intellect with your intuition, and are in touch with your emotions. You are able to effectively use whichever judging function a situation calls for. You have a comfortable sense of values and ethics, and under your detached exterior, you have a heart. Good job!

    source: personality cafe

    source: http://mbti-info.tumblr.com/

    Subscribe to Blog via Email

    Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 980 other subscribers

  • article Myers Briggs Reblogged

    Misplaced and/or Misdirected Cognitive Function Series | MBTI Listings

    Published by:

    Introverted Thinking

    The following are only a few of the ways in which the Introverted Thinking (Ti) function of a person is misplaced and/or misdirected:

    – Crippling perfectionism; having high standards and aiming to be and do well with them can be great as long as it’s not paralyzing and keeping from making the necessary ‘mistakes’ to change and improve where it’s needed.
    – Senseless fault-finding and nit-picking; focusing too much on what is wrong and losing sight of what is right (or highlighting what is wrong for no good reason and more often than necessary) can be both harmful and stagnating.
    – Endless questioning; questioning is important and recommendable to find and create solid foundations and constructs, but if it keeps going incessantly, it can needlessly break or impair the solidity of things.
    – Endless hypothesizing; hypothesizing is important and recommendable to come up with new ways to look at things and fill the gaps, but if it keeps going incessantly, it can leave no room for the facts and how things are truly like.
    – Destructive and unproductive battle of wits; intellectual conflict may form doorways to exploration and clarifications, but if there’s too much emphasis on proving one’s intellectual superiority and another’s intellectual inferiority, many opportunities to learn will be lost.
    – Insensitive and disrespectful prodding; it’s one thing to take interest in another person and participate in light teasing to get them to open up about matters, and it’s another to be pervasively insistent on getting someone to share about themselves (by pushing buttons and more) when they don’t want, need nor have to.
    – Dismantling and reducing to bare minimum; in exaggerated efforts to be “detached” and “impartial,” stripping objects and subjects to the point where they lose their meaning and significance.
    – Overvaluing intelligence and logic; believing intelligence and logic (in self and in others) are all that count and having little to no patience or appreciation for anything else not only lacks compassion – but also leads to a distorted and incomplete worldview.
    – Severe distrust and negativity; not that being happy-go-lucky is always that much better, but many worthwhile people and experiences can be missed (or even tainted) if there’s a strong predisposition to think the worst of them.
    – Projection; assuming they understand others when, in reality, they’re only attributing their own motives and intentions to others.

    Extraverted Thinking

    The following are only a few of the ways in which the Extraverted Thinking (Te) function of a person is misplaced and/or misdirected:

    Overconfidence and recklessness; being bold and taking risks can be important, but it can be taken too far – to the point where much more is lost than what was ever there to win to begin with.
    Over-controlling and micromanaging; people and things need time and space to work and be productive, being over their shoulder too much throughout the process may sabotage the possibility of better results.
    Over-delegating and entitlement; expecting and demanding from others to take care of tasks they could and should handle themselves.
    Being overly simplistic and dismissive; instead of being mentally agile and effectively reaching correct conclusions, information is carelessly processed and incorrect conclusions are believed.
    Sacrificing quality to be cost-effective; while there may be instances in life where this is the wiser choice, it is not as often as it may appear. Producing for the sake of producing can be counterproductive in many ways.
    Unyielding fixation on methods; learning a procedure and stubbornly adhering to it even when it shows to be more problematic and defective than others available to adapt to.
    Excessive ‘pragmatism’; continuing to choose what seems easier and safer over finding creative solutions to problems.
    Excessive elitism; rather than simply finding mind-mates and relatable people, looking down on and rejecting others based solely on perceived and imagined status.
    Brutal and dishonest communication; under the excuse and delusion of “just being honest,” unnecessarily saying harmful and distorted things.
    Projection; assuming they understand others when, in reality, they’re only attributing their own motives and intentions to others.

    Extraverted Feeling

    The following are only a few of the ways in which the Extraverted Feeling (Fe) function of a person is misplaced and/or misdirected:

    Excessive attachment; inability to let go of others who have long ceased to be (or want to be) connected to them.
    Excessive possessiveness; seeing others as extensions of themselves and feeling entitled to limit and to shape them to their own will, without much or any concern for what others truly want and need.
    Excessive protection; keeping others from making decisions on their own and from living their own experiences by instilling worries and fear where they’re not due.
    Lack of boundaries; meddling, intruding, giving little to no space or privacy – no matter how uncomfortable they’re making others.
    Overextended service; doing too much “for others” when it was not asked of them, when they were clearly asked to stop (several times) – and then resenting others for it and expecting and demanding in return.
    Overbearing pride; believing themselves to be superior and more deserving of validation on the sole basis of having better “social skills.”
    Condescension; believing they know better what’s best for others when, in fact, they don’t – and forcing their views onto others.
    Projection; assuming they understand others when, in reality, they’re only attributing their own motives and intentions to others.
    Falsehood for unmerited inclusion; tactically lying and delivering half-truths with the intent to persuade and convince themselves and others of someone’s “goodness.”
    Falsehood for unmerited exclusion; tactically lying and delivering half-truths with the intent to persuade and convince themselves and others of someone’s “badness.”

    Introverted Feeling

    The following are only a few of the ways in which the Introverted Feeling (Fi) function of a person is misplaced and/or misdirected:

    Championing a lost cause; being invested in a cause that, realistically, is too much for them to be able to help move forth or that’s simply not viable given the conditions and circumstances.
    Unreasonable moral standards; having excessively rigid and/or high “moral standards” which are, in many cases, nearly impossible to reach and/or doing so comes at the cost of much that’s of equal or more importance.
    Unreasonable indignation; being easily and visibly displeased by anything less than “perfect” according to their own personal values.
    Immoderate self-centeredness; more than being personally concerned with only themselves for some time, being so to the point of egotism and conceitedness – believing much outside themselves that they haven’t earned or deserve should be for them, at the cost of others and against others’ will.
    Inflated sense of uniqueness; believing themselves so different and special that it must automatically mean they’re more significant and valuable than most others.
    Poor self-reflection; not taking the time to truly reflect, get to the root emotions of their views and beliefs, and rearrange their inner world for the better.
    Romanticizing suffering; while suffering might enhance wisdom and empathy, this can be taken too far and be done for too long, leading to detriment and stagnation – or worse.
    Holding on to what should be let go of; remaining with someone or something that is mostly bad or wrong for them by fixating on the tiny bits that make it feel worthwhile, hoping things will change even though they continue to show no signs of this.
    Projection; assuming they understand others when, in reality, they’re only attributing their own motives and intentions to others.
    Excusing and justifying the inexcusable and unjustifiable; searching for ways to bend and twist perceptions to make the wrong seem right.

    Extraverted Sensing

    The following are only a few of the ways in which the Extraverted Sensing (Se) function of a person is misplaced and/or misdirected:

    – “Refined and sophisticated” taste; it may be impressive to be able to sense harmony and subtleties within given compositions, but this is not to be confused with being closed and narrow-minded by fixating on acclaimed standards of “beauty.” Embracing some variety and rawness is necessary to truly get to experience and know the physical realm.
    – Overindulgence in pleasures; it’s okay to indulge for we’re not meant to spend our lives only in sacrifice – the problem lies in overindulgence. Overindulging so much to the point that it is later regretted (out of one’s own conscience or due to its backlash) or not even enjoyable in the moment (as it’s not worthwhile) defeats the purpose of pleasure. Not to mention more unreasonable forms of it.
    – Reckless risk-taking and thrill-seeking; what may seem reckless to one person may not be to another who’s more able navigate and thrive in danger, but don’t completely ignore the consequences of your actions and consider those affected by them.
    – Abrasive and forceful behavior; there may be a time and a place for everything. Being aggressive or even violent doesn’t always have to be suppressed, but it also doesn’t have to be active at all times. There are fighting, dancing and other intense activities that can be participated in instead of constantly disrupting quieter and calmer places and people.
    – Volatility and reactiveness; becoming aware of surroundings and of what is happening before responding is at times much more beneficial than being impulsive.
    – ‘All that glitters is gold’ mentality; if it looks too good, maybe it’s not. Not to devalue everything, but to be watchful of illusions that grab attention of convince of something that’s not.
    – Mindlessly conforming to and depending on current trends and easy “fixes”; being at the mercy of circumstances rather than impacting, improving and/or overcoming them makes little use of natural potential. It’s often fine to join in and appreciate what’s actual before it’s gone or to cope in the short-term with what’s available when necessary, but it’s wasteful to be reduced by this.
    – Selfish opportunism; making “the most” or “the best” out of things sometimes has its costs and comes at the expense of others. Taking advantage of situations is not necessarily malicious or terribly self-serving, but it can be.
    – Lacking direction and going in circles; not all change and movement mean progress. Let and have actions amount to something greater.
    – Carefreeness verging on carelessness; worrying (on its own) doesn’t solve much, but neither does pretending problems don’t or won’t exist. There’s a difference between keeping it light and being indifferent.

    Introverted Sensing

    The following are only a few of the ways in which the Introverted Sensing (Si) function of a person is misplaced and/or misdirected:

    – Remembering things as worse or better than they actually were; in some cases, it’s okay to see things in a different light to be able to honor some sides of them or to be firm in not repeating them, but be watchful not to believe these versions as indisputably exact.
    – Having memories jumbled up inside, blended and confused; without taking the time to sort them out and appropriately group them, their sources, dates and more can be lost.
    – Assuming that a few similarities signify total sameness; while it’s definitely important to take note of certain signs to know and understand what we’re facing and dealing with, being too quick to judge can lead to many overgeneralizations.
    – Holding onto and investing in something mostly or only because of familiarity; it’s fine when it’s truly valuable or not too problematic, the issue is in tolerating and enduring for too long what one could be better off without.
    – Expecting and demanding more consistency than is reasonable; not everyone is going to be as consistent as one would like them to be (not everyone can, should or has to). And in some cases, some simply do not care enough to and you’d only be driving yourself crazy and wasting your time (or other resources) trying to make them.
    – Dismissive skepticism toward ideas and visions; believing ideas and visions without enough proof that they have any merit can be naive, but keep in mind that many things that once seemed impossible are now evident. Skepticism can instead contribute, for better or for worse, to clarifying, fleshing out and polishing ideas and visions.
    – Being closed off to anything new or different; be it out of fear, pride or something else, it might be too terribly prolonged and keep one in the dark or even deteriorate their health.
    – Refusing leaps of faith or steps toward the unknown; not that leaving the comfort zone and taking risks must be done 24/7, but sometimes it’s worth it. You can move forward and still be wisely cautious.
    – Hoarding possessively and/or with disregard; there may be collections of personal value that are well guarded and venerated, but be careful not to fail to see their worth or how they burden you. Decluttering and minimizing is at times essential (and so is proper treatment).
    – Failing to check for or see the relevance of facts; speculation and taking things at face value can only go so far, this function is to be accessed, among other things, for veracity.

    Extraverted Intuition

    The following are only a few of the ways in which the Extraverted Intuition (Ne) function of a person is misplaced and/or misdirected:

    Blowing matters out of proportion; exaggerations have their time and place for worthwhile effects and can be quite comical and illustrative, but it’s a different case when something important is at stake.
    Taking matters out of context; finding similitudes between differing areas can be clever and even brilliantly illuminating as long as it retains veracity or is at least made clear that fiction is heavily at play.
    Insensibly filling the gaps; guesses and approximations can push us to discover, to find out what is missing and what else is or could be there, but there isn’t always an invitation to throw in whatever we can think of.
    Changing and believing versions significantly removed from reality; seeing beyond what is apparent and searching for alternate ways to look at things can be honorable and admirable, but it can also be disastrous when done without sense.
    Emphasizing possibilities to the detriment of positive potential; becoming enthusiastic and/or cautious of what might be may serve growth and more, but mindfulness and restraint may be required to bring forth and protect the better of it.
    Extracting and highlighting pieces and patterns in a manner that distorts and/or debilitates;there’s much to everything and what’s selected from it can greatly, for better and/or for worse, impact things.
    Repeatedly going in circles and/or attempting to follow too many tangents at once;broadening and revising perspectives aids clarity and grants wisdom, but some amount of focus and direction may be necessary for this to be fruitful.
    Overwhelming to exhaustion and suffocation; being quick-witted and bursting with ideas is a valuable talent that can be relieving and enlivening if it leaves room for and helps breathe.
    Sacrificing depth and quality for the sake of multitasking; sometimes slowing the pace and committing to only a handful of tasks can be more productive and fulfilling.
    Selfish and obsessive fascination and discussion of subjects; being curious and exchanging knowledge can be rewarding for everyone involved if reasonable boundaries and privacy are respected.

    Introverted Intuition

    The following are only a few of the ways in which the Introverted Intuition (Ni) function of a person is misplaced and/or misdirected:

    Superiority/God complex; it’s tempting to believe that having easy access to the overviews and undercurrents of situations places someone above others, but this may only be delusional and foolish – wisdom comes with humility.
    Everything must be part of a calculated scheme and/or further an agenda; while it may be grand to not let time and other resources go to waste, to see everything fall into place and become something greater than the sum of its parts, not everything can or should fit into a vision – some things just have to be allowed or let go of.
    Extreme tunnel vision; keeping focus and avoiding distractions may be necessary, particularly within certain situations that require it, but taking it to extremes in some instances might turn into no more than narrow-mindedness, stubbornness and ignorance.
    Deceit and/or lack of explanation; as a non-verbal process, it may be difficult to communicate and make understandable. However, this does not mean that deceit is more favorable nor that one shouldn’t at least make an effort to illustrate when necessary.
    Demanding profoundness and greatness in all; it’s fine to look for the extraordinary and to also see the extraordinary in the ordinary, but sometimes appreciating (or at least tolerating) the simplicity in the simple things is what can get us through the day.
    Distanced disconnection; detachment and non-attachment may serve well for clarity and impartiality, but too much distance and disconnection might reduce and diminish important matters.
    Apathy due to perceived “sameness’ and “predictability”; believing nothing matters because everything can be stripped down to the same predictable patterns misses the fact that there’s much more, composing all, that can be looked forward to.
    Assuming knowledge and understanding; being able to immediately grasp a concept or the essence of something can seem like a quick absorption of all that it’s made of, but this may be far from being the case and instead only vague knowledge and understanding are reached.
    Erroneous connections and synthesis; just as correlation does not equal causation and outcomes don’t necessarily imply intention, combining and summing up information may result in erroneous assessments when appropriate discernment is not practiced.
    Reactively trusting intuitive callings without insight; learning to hear what hunches are truly trying to say takes introspection and contemplation – without this, inner and outer conditions could get mixed up and be inaccurately read.

     

    source: mbtilistings

    Subscribe to Blog via Email

    Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 980 other subscribers

  • article mbti list Myers Briggs

    The Trickster Role Of Each Myers Briggs Type

    Published by:

    Continue reading

    Subscribe to Blog via Email

    Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 980 other subscribers

  • article list mbti list Myers Briggs

    The Opposing Role of Each Myers Briggs Type

    Published by:

    Shop: Top Brand shoes at Amazon

    The Opposing Role

    The opposing role is the 5th function and the first shadow function in the Beebe model’s extended 8-function stack. This function’s role manifests as a reaction towards the ego and especially its heroic dominant perspective when being opposed or obstructed. Obstruction might also be when the ego’s connection with the anima (or inferior function) is obstructed. This function refuses to “play” and join in whatever is going on at the time. Your 5th function is used mainly as a defense and manifests as unfriendly, rude and uncooperative. 

    “The opposing personality is a primary resource of defense, a part of us that tends to lurch forward first when we feel our heroic superior function and it’s most cherished values to be under attack”. (p132)  It is “oppositional, paranoid, passive-aggressive and avoidant”, (p. 41, 58, 132) and also ‘easy to project onto others, especially a person of the opposite sex”. “Projecting the opposing personality will cause a man to see the woman in a negative or troublesome light as she seems to embody the man’s own antagonistic traits”

    It might be easy for us to develop skill in the process that plays this role, but we are likely to be more narrow in our application of this skill, and it will likely take more energy to use it extensively. In its positive aspect, it provides a shadow or depth to our leading role process, backing it up and enabling us to be more persistent in pursuit of our goals.




    Opposing Role: Extroverted Thinking


     INTP

    TiNeSiFeTeNiSeFi

    ISTP

    TiSeNiFeTeSiNeFi

     

    • Tries to beat others at their logic using their own principles.
    • Tries to promote their frameworks as being the most efficient, and in some way get them implemented.
    • Think that agreed upon logical rules are stupid and a waste of time.
    • Spunky Te types might be sexy.
    • Recognizing the need for external efficiency.
    • Feel obstructed in or become stubborn about the way the environment is organized, and other mechanical things.
    • Can become critical, disgruntled with disorder, illogic, or inefficiency.
    • Can become stubborn about organizing things and insist on a systematic approach.
    • Lashes out if others criticize their logic with emotional arguments, and make subjective arguments.
    • Spend unnecessary time establishing order, planning, and misguide themselves and others in the process.
    • “The environment should be ordered in a way that makes sense to me”.
    • Orders the external world according to what makes sense to the “hero” (dominant function). Opposes those who order it differently.
    • Will back up the ego’s internal technical model of how things should be, and thus when the principles are violated, it will be “stubborn” about how things are technically organized.




    Opposing Role: Extroverted Intuition


     INTJ

    NiTeFiSeNeTiFeSi

    INFJ

    NiFeTiSeNeFiTeSi

     

    • Turns toward external stimuli to back up their internal perceptions.
    • Feel obstructed in or become stubborn about emergent meanings and hypothetical possibilities.
    • Probably think that multiple possibilities are absurd. The patterns point to one right conclusion.
    • Over-reading between the lines, often misinterpreting someone’s actions and seeing negative intentions where there are none.
    • Interpret situations in a naive way, inferring malice where none exists.
    • Oblivious to unspoken potentials and get off track with inferences and interconnections.
    • Stubborn about responding to emerging information and locking on to a hidden meaning.
    • Veers away from likely outcomes according to internalized conceptual patterns and merges with the objects themselves, using their open, multiple meanings or possibilities to toss out at others, perhaps sarcastically.




    Opposing Role: Introverted Intuition


     ENTP

    NeTiFeSiNiTeFiSe

    ENFP

    NeFiTeSiNiFeTiSe

     

    • Feel obstructed by or become stubborn about their perceptions of unconscious images and meanings.
    • Taking only one possibility derived individually instead of the multitudes from the environment, is stupid and limiting.
    • Will “lock on” to an internal negative perception of what will happen.
    • Make dire predictions with certainty and mistake deep symbolism as a guidepost for life.
    • Envision how something will play out and ignore signs that it won’t work out, foreseeing disaster or nothing at all.
    • Stubborn about perceptions of how the future will be, and lock onto a vision that won’t happen.
    • Indulge negative thoughts of how events will unfold.




     Opposing Role: Introverted Thinking


     ENTJ

    TeNiSeFiTiNeSiFe

    ESTJ

    TeSiNeFiTiSeNiFe

     

    • Feel obstructed in or become stubborn about individually understood technical principles and robotically following them.
    • Breaking things down into [individually assessed] trivial detail is stupid, inefficient and a waste of time.
    • Steps aside from the means to the end of implementing efficiency, to referencing the inherent “universal” principles, explaining why this is the way it should be, or why others should understand or act accordingly.
    • May make statements or believe in ideas that are contradictory and illogical.
    • Caught up in pointing out others’ inconsistencies, with a dogmatic tendency to adhere to one principle rather than seeing its distinctions.
    • Can be stubborn about the models and principles they’ve adopted, categorising everything simplistically and robotically following the principles.
    • Prefer not to articulate operating principles and can get stuck in models and frameworks they have learned or adapted.




    Opposing Role: Extroverted Feeling


     INFP

    FiNeSiTeFeNiSeTi

    ISFP

    FiSeNiTeFeSiNeTi

     

    • Feel obstructed in or become stubborn about environmental [human] group standards.
    • Think that agreed upon ethics do not get to the real needs of people; affect them negatively, etc.
    • Will appeal to external societal values to defend personal valuations.
    • Over-address others’ concerns and feel disappointment over a false sense of closeness.
    • Convinced others don’t like, appreciate, or need them, and over-accommodate others needs.
    • Stubborn about how others affect them and resist being pulled into being responsible for others feelings and choices.
    • Can be quite critical and disgruntled about the expectations of the group to the point of rebellion and disengaging.




     Opposing Role: Introverted Feeling


     ENFJ

    FeNiSeTiFiNeSiTe

    ESFJ

    FeSiNeTiFiSeNiTe
    • Feel obstructed in or become stubborn about individual personal values.
    • Tailoring everything to individual personal needs is too much trouble.
    • Retreats to their own personal values (as a defense), which they normally adapt to accommodate others.
    • Inverts their value system erecting a hard stiff wall of what is important and desired to themselves personally.
    • Rigidly following a belief system or what they personally think is important, with accompanying childish and/or selfish behavior.
    • Spend money and time on things that are unimportant and care little about the value of things.
    • Be stubborn about values as they crusade for a particular cause, turning off people instead of mobilizing them.
    • Dwell on conflicts in beliefs, being critical, and locking into their desires by bulldozing others.




    Opposing Role: Extroverted Sensing


     ISTJ

    SiTeFiNeSeTiFeNi

    ISFJ

    SiFeTiNeSeFiTeNi
    • Feel obstructed in or become stubborn about tangible/practical reality.
    • Think that living in the moment is irresponsible. (However, some who do it are sexy).
    • Focus is shifted to current, emergent reality to backup past knowledge.
    • Stubborn about going on impulse and insist that they have an accurate read of the situation.
    • Excessively seek physical stimulation or following the urge to do nothing; zero in on isolated details, acting impulsively on them.
    • Dwell on the perceived “realities” of a situation; act highly impulsively.
    • Go on about “facts,” blocking others’ proposed actions, or get caught up in the moment and engage in impulsive behavior.




    Opposing Role: Introverted Sensing


    ESTP

    SeTiFeNiSiTeFiNe

    ESFP

    SeFiTeNiSiFeTiNe

     

    • Feel obstructed by or become stubborn about their perceptions of how things once were.
    • Memorized rules and such are stupid and limiting of freedom.
    • The past (stored tangible data) is used as a reference to how it links to the present, which they will stubbornly cling to.
    • Can become stubborn about their perception of the past and fixated on its relation to the present.
    • Prefer not to focus on the past but can be quite critical of past performances and overuse negative experiences to inform decisions.
    • Cling to what they are used to; repeat themselves in ritualistic fashion.
    • Get stuck in impressions of how things were and resist change; waste time reviewing the impact of the past.




    related posts:

     

     

    Subscribe to Blog via Email

    Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 980 other subscribers

  • article list mbti list Myers Briggs

    The Critical Parent Role of Each Myers Briggs Type

    Published by:

    In cognitive theory, the critical parent role or witch/senex represents the 6th function in a type’s cognitive stack. As part of the shadow processes the critical parent indicates the function used to spot weak points in ourselves and others and attack them with scathing criticisms and demoralizing invectives. It’s also referred to as the “demonstrative function” and represents a hidden strength present in every type. Continue reading

    Subscribe to Blog via Email

    Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 980 other subscribers

  • article list mbti list Myers Briggs

    The Devilish Role of Each Myers Briggs Type

    Published by:

    In cognitive theory, the devilish role is the 8th function in the functional stack and forms part of the shadow processes. The devilish role manifests under stressful conditions and can be quite negative. In using the process that plays this role, we might become destructive of ourselves or others and engage in behavior that will later be regretted. Continue reading

    Subscribe to Blog via Email

    Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 980 other subscribers

  • %d bloggers like this: