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Why The MBTI Types Are Sleep Deprived

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Regardless of MBTI type, getting enough sleep is vital for wellbeing. Not snoozing enough has serious effects on your mood, health and concentration. Of course, sleeping too much can also be a problem… but that’s for another discussion. Here’s why each MBTI type is likely to become sleep deprived.
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    Why You Should Try Yoga for Weight Loss

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    Yoga Burn – yoga for weight loss

    Yoga for Weight Loss

    [dropcap]W[/dropcap]hatever your level of fitness, Yoga is an excellent addition to a healthy lifestyle. But is it effective for losing weight? Many argue it is.

    Few people would deny that yoga offers physical and mental benefits in the form of stress management, mental calm, limberness, strength, balance and better blood flow. But as it turns out, it may also effectively aid in fat loss.

    In 2005, a medical study led by a researcher and yogi named Alan Kristal, DPH, MPH, a trial involving 15,500 healthy, middle-aged men and women found that the overweight individuals who practiced yoga lost 5 pounds during the same period at which non-yoga practitioners gained 14 pounds.

    Types of Yoga for Weight Loss Beginners

    There are a variety of Yoga disciplines, and the best one for you depends on a variety of factors including age, body type and fitness level. Some are physically demanding and intense cardio workouts while others are serene exercises of stillness and mental focus. Here is a rundown on the types of Yoga you can try.

    1. Hatha

    This form of yoga focuses on posture, balance and breathing techniques. Hatha is a slower, gentler form a Yoga and is recommended for beginners so they can learn to control breathing and perform basic postures that form the foundations of all Yoga.

    2. Vinyasa

    This type of yoga is faster paced and rhythmic. It focuses on coordinating breathing with movement in a dance-like choreography often accompanied with beat driven music. It is designed to raise the heart rate and provides a great form of cardio that lovers of endurance exercise and HIIT (high intensity interval training) will enjoy.

    3. Iyengar

    This yoga concentrates on precision of form and posture. It is more advanced than Hatha but slower than Vinyasa. It incorporates props such as ropes and straps and yoga blocks and develops core strength that allows the body to maintain balance while holding difficult postures.

    4. Ashtanga

    This consists of a series of 6 choreographed sequences of poses meant to be performed in a specific order. You move from one pose to the next in a controlled manner while focusing on building internal heat.

    5. Bikram

    Bikram is a high-intensity workout performed under sweltering conditions. Bikram classes are practiced in a room heated to 105 degrees and 40% humidity. It consists of 26 poses performed in a 90-minute session and can be very strenuous especially for novices.

    6. Hot Yoga

    Hot yoga, like Bikram, is performed in a heated room but isn’t constrained to the 26 poses Bikram has. The elevated heat increases the depth of stretching. It combines the benefits of saunas with flexibility.

    7. Kundalini

    This form of yoga differs from the others in that it introduces an additional element to the traditional yoga movements: chanting and singing. This is more mentally challenging and requires intense breath work and repetitive vocalizations for the purpose of unlocking untapped energy and achieving transcendence and heightened self-awareness.

    Yoga Weight Loss Stories

    Jennifer B. Niles, an author, yogi and health coach wrote a post on the MBG website detailing the significant health and weight loss benefits she experienced with Yoga. She wrote:

    Less than one year after practicing yoga six to seven days per week, I lost a total of 85 pounds. My weight loss was a direct result of a committed yoga practice coupled with a plant-based diet. No other exercise or gym equipment was required. I shed excess fat using nothing but a yoga mat and my own body weight.

    Try Yoga Burn® For Women

    yoga for weight loss

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    The Truth About Dieting: 4 Reasons Why Most Diet Plans Fail

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    diet plans

    Achieve your weight loss goals with smart diet plans.

    Diet Plans can be hard to stick with

    [dropcap]W[/dropcap]ondering why you just cannot see success with your diet plans? Do you feel like every diet you go on, you eventually fall off somewhere along the line?

    Are you ready to toss in the towel on fat loss for good?

    Don’t be. If you stop and take a minute to look at the four reasons why most diets fail, and then find yourself a diet plan that overcomes these reasons, you will soon find yourself on track to optimal success. Let’s look at the four key factors that you need to know.

    Unrealistic Calorie Intakes

    The first big reason why most diets fail is because they simply have you striving to take in an unrealistic number of calories each day. In other words, they put you into “starvation mode”. They are causing you to consume so little food that your body literally starts shutting down to conserve fuel.

    When it does this, you know that you are on a one-way path to a fat loss plateau. Yes, you do need to lower your calorie intake to see fat loss results, but you need to do so wisely in a way that you can maintain your “metabolic engine”, so to speak.

    Lack Of Satiety-Boosting Nutrients

    Next, another big issue with most conventional diets is they aren’t providing you enough of the two most satisfying nutrients: protein and fiber. You need protein to function optimally. It’s also the nutrient that’s the slowest to break down and digest in the body, so it will provide immediate satiety. Couple that with dietary fiber, which is found in fresh fruits and vegetables, and it’ll slow digestion even further.

    Many crash diet plans are very low in protein, and while they do have you eating lots of vegetables, many discourage the consumption of fruit. By making these two nutrients a focus of your plan instead, you can see results that much faster and enjoy being on the diet while you do.

    Time Consuming Meal Prep

    Who has an hour each and every day to meal prep? Not me — and definitely not you. Yet, many diet plans are so complex that they require this. If that’s the diet you’re on, it’s no wonder you’re failing. Instead, you want to find an approach that gives you some basic and easy-to-implement guidelines that will help you realize true success with your program.

    This plan should not take hours to follow each week, and should work with your lifestyle. When you find such a plan, it’ll be easier than ever to stick with.

    Long-Term Approach

    Now, chances are you’ve heard that any diet you follow should encourage a long-term approach — and I agree. When you make diet changes, you should be focusing on maintaining healthy eating in the long term. But, if your diet plan is designed to go on for months, this can kill your motivation in its tracks.

    Find a diet plan with a definite deadline. Three weeks is optimal here as that is the amount of time it takes to build good habits – habits that stick. Also, three weeks is a long enough period of time that you can see good results, but not so long that it’s hard to stay motivated.

    Anyone should be able to do three weeks if they put their mind to it. This is precisely what The 3 Week Diet is built upon. By doing this diet, you can see remarkable changes in as little as three short weeks and once you see how easy it is to melt the fat, you’ll want to stick with the plan much longer than that.

    Check out what The 3 Week Diet has to offer.

    The 3 Week Diet

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    The 5 Commandments Of Smart Dieting

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    The 3 Week Diet

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    The Weight Loss Myth You Should Stop Believing

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    One of the most common weight loss myths is this damn dirty idea that a cleanse or detox will cause you to lose weight. These companies sell laxatives to people and call them detox teas. I usually try to post a lot of evidence/science/research in my answers, but I can’t with this one. But the lack… Continue reading

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  • article mbti list Myers Briggs

    MBTI Stress | The 16 Types When Overwhelmed With Stress

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    mbti stress

    “Big small world” by adrianismyname – mbti stress

    MBTI Stress

    [dropcap]M[/dropcap]ounting stress and pressure can lead to a complete and epic unraveling of our psychological fabric that gives way to a side of ourselves that others despise. How we respond to that stress and the types of stress we are sensitive to will vary from person to person. In the Myers Briggs type theory, each personality type manifests signs of stress in ways particular to them and the sources and causes of it will differ as well. Although there are life conditions that everyone finds to be stressful, the stress responses of some types can be triggered by events and circumstances that a different type may experience as desirable and energizing.

    intp stress

    mbti stress

    INTP

    [dropcap]U[/dropcap]nder extreme stress, INTPs will become hyper critical of other’s expectations and demands, while simultaneously craving their affection and appreciation. INTP’s thoughts will grow increasingly complicated and disconnected from objective reality, instead focusing on largely subjective and paranoid interpretations of the events occurring around them. Frustrations will lead INTPs to develop various phobias and psychosomatic fears, becoming uncharacteristically concerned with their physical health and the effect that their environment can have on it

    When stressed out, INTP’s intense emotions will come to the surface. Major triggers for this include having their need for space and introversion violated and disrespected (ex. others intruding on their space and uninvited visitors), or having their principles and convictions trampled on. Under these circumstances, INTPs will likely find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Extraverted Feeling.  At this point, INTPs are likely to behave completely out of character.  They will become more emotionally engaged and obsessed with their logic and will be more argumentative, while at the same time becoming increasingly disorganized and forgetful of mundane matters. INTPs may become hypersensitive and take insignificant details and remarks more personally than normal. They may develop the belief that others dislike or hate them, and they may become uncharacteristically emotional and bitter.


    Stressors:


    • Being boxed in and constrained by responsibilities
    • Being forced to do un-challenging and repetitive work
    • Working with incompetent, chatty people
    • Teamwork
    • Supervising others and monitoring their work
    • Too much extraverting
    • Emotionally charged situations
    • Being underappreciated for their abilities and contribution
    • People invading their space
    • INTP money issues

    Stress Response:


    • Withdrawal and quietness; increased irritability
    • Excessive thinking and cogitating with emphasis on logic; paralysis of analysis
    • Intellectually combative and increasingly insensitive to emotional climate
    • Emotional outbursts
    • Feelings of not being liked or appreciated
    • Forgetfulness, disorganization, confusion
    • Passive aggressiveness
    • Sarcastic and mean remarks
    • Vagueness, distractibility, disorganization



    intj stress

    mbti stress

    INTJ

    Typically INTJ’s get peeved and discontented in environments where their intellectual prowess is not valued or appreciated. INTJs get drained in places full of noisy, boisterous people and when being forced to extravert themselves too much with little to no “alone time” to replenish their energy.  INTJs will also have little patience when working with people they deem to be lazy and incompetent. They quickly tire of tasks that require ample attention to detail with specific repetitive procedures and methods.

    INTJs are accustomed to living in their internal world at the expense of their physical and emotional needs. Romantic feelings can take them by surprise and destabilize their psychological balance. Because they feel their emotional impulses threaten their sense of self-control they often resort to denial of their existence and attempt to rationalize their emotions with logic and principles that do not even apply.


    Stressors:


    • Noisy boisterous environments
    • Lazy incompetent co-workers
    • Meticulous robotic work
    • New environments
    • Having to change their plans
    • Too much focus on the present
    • Not enough time to think ahead

    Stress Response:


    • Withdraw into the inner world of  images and possibilities; become quiet
    • Stubbornness and increased irritability
    • Become very busy; focus on low priority tasks
    • Become obsessively concerned with detail;paralysis of  analysis
    • Angry and critical at people and/or things
    • Over focused on gratifying the senses
    • Elitism; “I know everything, you know nothing”
    • Overdoing sensory activities like drinking, cleaning, working out etc.
    • Intense anger
    • INTJ depression



    entp stress

    MBTI stress

    ENTP

    In most cases, ENTPs will be averse to environments wherever creativity is restricted or stifled.  ENTPs become stressed when they are deprived of external stimulation, denied autonomy, or are forced to commit themselves to binding decisions for which they have little wiggle room. They are also stressed by environments that do not appreciate their originality and clever ideas.

    When stressed, ENTPs will become flighty and will start to look for the nearest exit for fear that their freedom is at stake. They become impulsive and coquettish and justify their behavior so as to avoid perceived entrapment. ENTPs become increasingly defiant as pressure and responsibilities mount while at the same becoming ever more dependent on others to help them with managing various aspects of their duties.


    Stressors:


    • Lack of external stimulus
    • Feeling restricted and controlled
    • Having their creativity stifled
    • Being forced to make long term decisions
    • Working with individuals they view as incompetent
    • Having their cleverness go unappreciated
    • Having their principles violated
    • Working with mundane details
    • Overextending themselves

    Stress Response:


    • Excessive flow of  exciting new ideas without evaluation
    • Increased impatience, irritability, frankness, insensitivity, and debating
    • Over-involvement in numerous activities; stretched thin
    • Become obsessive, picky, and compulsive
    • Withdrawal, immobility, depression
    • Excessive and exaggerated worry about bodily sensations
    • Anxiety
    • Irritability, upset about insignificant things
    • Self-deprecation



    ENTJ

    When experiencing stress, ENTJs may fall “under the grip” of their inferior function, Introverted Feeling. This may emerge in response to intense emotions stemming from guilt over criticism of others, or having their strong values and/or feelings violated. When this happens, ENTJs are likely to exhibit behavior that is unlike them including uncharacteristic emotional outbursts and isolating themselves away from others while they try to restore control over their psychological balance.

    ENTJs are inclined to believe that the source of their distress lies outside of themselves and therefore they’re quick to blames others for their problems. They perceive other people as being needy and illogical, and also systems and organizations as inefficient and hindering. Everything and everyone seems to be holding them back, therefore they feel compelled to take matters into their own hands and set things right.


    Stressors:


    • Disruptions to their plans.
    • A Lack of results despite their hard efforts
    • Feeling incompetent
    • Lazy unmotivated people
    • Being in a subordinate roles
    • Inability to realize their goals
    • Hypersensitive emotional people
    • Feelings of guilt for criticizing others
    • Having their values and principles violated
    • Idleness and wasting of time.
    • Missed opportunities

    Stress Response:


    • Excessive criticism; categorical negative judgments about people and events
    • Increased irritability, sense of  pressure and anxiety, impatience, and insensitivity
    • Increasing tunnel vision and difficulty listening to input from others
    • Feeling out of  control; distress at possibly losing control
    • Strong emotional outbursts; feelings of vulnerability; withdrawal
    • Excessive sensitivity to feeling alone, left out, unappreciated
    • Sadism, not caring or not being aware when crushing other people’s feelings
    • Viewing others as weak
    • Closed mindedness, not willing to accept any alternatives



    INFP

    When experiencing stress overload, which may come from a gross or frequent violation of their deeply held values, spending time in an emotionally toxic and/or excessively critical environment, or worrying that they are about to lose someone or something (relationship, task, etc.) close to them, INFPs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Extraverted Thinking.  During this experience, the individual is likely to do things that are typically completely out of character.

    INFPs usually dislike conflict and are prone to acting in a passive-aggressive way when they experience frustration or dissatisfaction. They are deeply dedicated to being their ‘true selves’, to the extent that they will avoid any people or situations that do not fit in with their inner value system, tending to become rather intolerant and hard to please. As stress increases, they may become extremely whimsical and stubborn, insisting on acting as they feel but ignoring the logical consequences and implications of their actions.


    Stressors:


    • Inflexible schedules and routines
    • Violations of their values
    • Being in rowdy boisterous environments
    • Extraverting themselves too much
    • small talk and glib exchanges
    • disingenuous people
    • restrictions to their creativity
    • being tied down and working on highly detailed tasks

    Stress Response:


    • Withdraw, become preoccupied; begin noticing difficulty sleeping and increased eating
    • Become hypersensitive to imagined slights
    • Avoid or put off  actions that might create discomfort or conflict
    • Become extremely critical of  others
    • May find self  or others to be terribly incompetent
    • Exaggerated and impulsive directing or organizing of  environment or others
    • Hopelessness, sadness
    • Martyr-like attitude
    • Loss of confidence and motivation



    INFJ

    When faced with stress overload, which may come from dealing with unfamiliar environments with overwhelming amounts of details, having to extravert too much or in uncomfortable ways, or having their well settled plans disrupted, INFJs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Extraverted Sensing.  In this state, the individual is likely to do things that are typically completely out of character.  This may include over doing it on the pleasures of the senses by binge-eating, over-exercising, buying lots of useless items, etc..

    INFJs tend to withdraw from reality into a fantasy world of their own, which gradually gains importance as they become dissatisfied with their real life and the people in it. While fulfilling the demands of their outer commitments, they harbor secret criticism and the feeling that their imaginary world and the characters that inhabit it are more important than the actual people in their lives.


    Stressors:


    • discord in their relationships
    • violations of their values
    • excessive extraverting
    • Being amongst close-minded people
    • Feeling under appreciated and under-valued
    • Adjusting to new environments
    • disruptions to their plans
    • Lack of direction and purpose
    • Disharmony and conflict

    Stress Response:


    • Withdraw into the inner world of  images and possibilities; become quiet
    • Moodiness and perfectionism
    • Become very busy; focus on low priority tasks
    • Become obsessively concerned with detail; feeling out of  control
    • Angry and critical at people and/or things
    • Over focused on gratifying the senses
    • Elitism; “I know everything, you know nothing”
    • Overdoing sensory activities like drinking, cleaning, working out etc.
    • Intense anger



    ENFP

    When confronted with stressful situations, which may come from working in environments where their values are violated, having to focus for long periods of time on mundane details, and good old fashion exhaustion (often caused by overextending oneself), ENFPs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Introverted Sensing.  During this experience, the individual is likely to do things that are typically completely out of character such as splitting hairs over petty details and a reluctance to try anything new. This may include a reduced creativity and withdrawing into themselves and becoming depressed.

    ENFPs in distress tend to feel overloaded and overwhelmed by too much to do. They feel they’re trying to help others and make their lives better but their efforts are unappreciated and there are always more expectations and demands. In such situations, ENFPs are likely to start shirking their responsibilities, forgetting their appointments or being late for the deadlines.


    Stressors:


    • micromanaging and being micromanaged
    • being forced to focus on the here and now
    • having to follow restrictive regimens and routines
    • not being allowed to be creative
    • lack of external stimulus
    • fulfilling deadlines
    • Criticism
    • Lack of appreciation
    • Working within a highly structured, rigid, detail-oriented environment
    • Being required to do something that violates your values
    • Feeling distrusted, disrespected, ignored, not recognized
    • Receiving criticism about yourself or what you have created
    • Finding that you are unable to fulfill the multiple demands you have taken on yourself

    Stress Response:


    • Excessive flow of  exciting new ideas without evaluation
    • Increasing disorganization, impatience, and forgetfulness
    • Over-involvement in numerous activities;stretched thin
    • Become obsessive, picky, and compulsive
    • Withdrawal and isolation with depression
    • Excessive and exaggerated worry about bodily sensations
    • Anxiety
    • Irritability, upset about insignificant things
    • Self-deprecation
    • Obsessing about irrelevant details and facts
    • Focusing excessively on their body, imagining that they have some dire illness
    • Being irritable, snappish, impatient
    • Feeling depressed, hopeless; withdrawing
    • Failing to see any possibilities beyond their current, dismal reality
    • Being pessimistic and incapable of seeing the big picture
    • Engaging in inflexible, rigid thinking



    ENFJ

    When faced with stress overload, which may come from being expected to conform with something that goes against their values, spending time in an emotionally toxic, combative, and/or excessively critical environment, or being in an environment where there is a basic lack of trust between individuals, ENFJs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Introverted Thinking.  When this occurs, the individual is likely to do things that are typically completely out of character such as exhibiting indecision and excessive procrastination and overthinking.  They may also lash out at others, and become overly critical of mistakes committed by both themselves and others.

    ENFJs are likely to start feeling somewhat disappointed with the relationships they worked so hard to build. They experience a lack of enthusiasm and passion about the people around them and as a consequence they feel guilty about it, believing that they’re losing themselves and letting down their loved ones. Acutely concerned with being seen as empathetic, loving people and highly sensitive to rejection and criticism, they strive to maintain appearances even though deep inside they may feel rather joyless.


    Stressors:


    • disharmony
    • obstructions to their plans
    • deadlines
    • intense environments and working conditions
    • boring repetitive tasks
    • having to conform and go against their standards
    • absorbing other people’s stress
    • Being misunderstood or mistrusted
    • fear of not living up to their potential

    Stress Response:


    • Over attentive to others’ feelings—trying to make things “right” with others or trying to fix others’ perceived difficulties
    • Inflexibility and increasing difficulty seeing/trying new approaches
    • Begin noticing physical symptoms of stress;appetite disturbances
    • Extreme criticism, even condemnation, of others based on small events
    • Black-and-white thinking, confusion, needing assurance of  the “one” right answer
    • Withdrawal, criticism of  self, lack of  concern for your impact on others
    • Feeling unappreciated, taken for granted
    • General sadness, withdrawal
    • Frequent mood swings



    isfj stress

    MBTI stress

    ISFJ

    When laden with stress overload, which may come from dealing with unfamiliar territory and uncertain futures, dealing with others who seem to work outside of the current reality, or having to overuse their type by being expected to constantly act as “the responsible one”, ISFJs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Extraverted Intuition.  During this experience, the individual is likely to do things that are typically completely out of character such as perceiving slights and offenses that are more imagined than actual.  They may also become at odds with the facts and details they normally depend on. to the extent such details are interpreted as being ominous.

    ISFJs have the tendency to lose themselves in emotional and moral commitments, seeing themselves as indispensable to and intrinsic part of the cause they’ve identified with. At this point they can become self-sacrificing martyrs whose only purpose is the happiness and well-being of others. They can end up in bad relationships where they’re willingly being used and put in a service-oriented position. As their stress increases they begin to cling to people and try to keep them attached by undermining their independence and offering them unconditional care and support instead.


    Stressors:


    • feeling under appreciated and under valued
    • tense environments
    • tight deadlines
    • being overloaded with too many tasks
    • feeling like the only one who is responsible
    • dealing with abstract concepts
    • adjusting to new things, and people

    Stress Response:


    • Nose to the grindstone; increased irritability and sense of  pressure
    • Stubbornness; over focus on detail and organizing
    • Withdrawal and increased quietness; fatigue and other physical symptoms
    • Feelings of  loss of control or confusion
    • Excessive doom saying; anticipation of only negative futures
    • Unusually impulsive behavior
    • General negativity
    • Blaming others without a reason
    • Unusual impulsivity and spontanity



    ISTJ

    When faced with stress overload, which may come from dealing with unfamiliar territory and uncertain futures, dealing with others who seem to work outside of the current reality, or having to overuse their type by being expected to constantly act as “the responsible one”, ISTJs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Extraverted Intuition.  During this experience, the individual is likely to do things that are typically completely out of character such as interpreting bizarre meanings and focusing on negative possibilities rather than the present reality.

    As the pressure rises, they become increasingly intolerant of diversity and may start seeing other people as irresponsible and lacking appropriate standards and ethics. They try to take control of others and become stuck in limiting rules and regulations, afraid of change and taking any risks into the unknown.


    Stressors:


    • dealing with problems for which their past experience is of no use
    • having to improvise
    • too much extraverting
    • emotionally intense situations
    • disorganized environments
    • tight dealines
    • deviating from established methods and trying new approaches
    • Being asked to do something without a plan or direction
    • being in unfamiliar surroundings

    Stress Response:


    • Nose to the grindstone; increased irritability
    • Stubbornness; over focus on detail and organizing
    • Withdrawal and increased quietness
    • Feelings of  loss of  control or confusion
    • Excessive doom saying; anticipation of only negative futures
    • Unusually impulsive behavior
    • General negativity
    • Blaming others without a reason
    • Unusual impulsivity and spontanity



    esfj stress

    MBTI stress

    ESFJ

    When faced with stress overload, which may come from being expected to conform with something that goes against their values, spending time in an emotionally toxic, combative, and/or excessively critical environment, or being in an environment where there is a basic lack of trust between individuals, ESFJs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Introverted Thinking.  During this experience, the individual is likely to do things that are typically completely out of character such as over-analyzing problems and exhibiting indecision. They may also become highly critical of others logic and thus lash out at them, focusing on their mistakes and perceived lack of competence, and flaws.

    ESFJs usually keep their distress and inner conflicts away from public eye. They are terrified of being judged and criticized by others while on the other hand they can be highly intolerant of what they perceive as inappropriate behaviors. They begin to feel used and unappreciated by others and as their resentment grows, they are prone to rash and thoughtless actions that may end up damaging the relationships they care so much for.


    Stressors:


    • lack of structure in the workplace
    • dealing with abstract concepts
    • interpersonal conflict
    • sudden changes to their plans
    • tight dealines
    • disharmony in their relationships
    • conflicts and violations of their values
    • feeling unappreciated and unsupported by others
    • Criticism

    Stress Response:


    • Over attentive to others’ feelings; trying to make things “right” with others or trying to fix others’ perceived difficulties
    • Inflexibility and increasing difficulty seeing or trying new approaches
    • Begin noticing physical symptoms of  stress;appetite disturbances
    • Extreme criticism, even condemnation, of others based on small events
    • Black-and-white thinking, difficulty thinking clearly, confusion
    • Withdrawal, criticism of self, feeling inadequate
    • Feeling unappreciated, taken for granted
    • General sadness, withdrawal
    • Frequent mood swings



    estj stress

    MBTI stress

    ESTJ

    When burdened with stress, which may come from being confronted with intense emotions, feeling guilt over being critical towards others, or not having their strongly held values and/or feelings validated, ESTJs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Introverted Feeling.  When this happens, the individual is likely to do things that are typically completely uncharacteristic such as pontificating and exhibiting self righteous behavior.  They may also have emotional outbursts and withdraw from others to conceal their emotional instability. ESTJs may become overly sensitive regarding their relationships and interpret tiny, inconsequential details as signs that others dislike or hate them.

    ESTJs are likely to start viewing others as being overly subjective and weak, therefore consider that it’s time to take control and set things right. They can become domineering and uncompromising, imposing their viewpoint and considering their logic as the only valid standard. Craving personal contact and affection, but unable to give in to their emotional side, they blame others for being corrupt, subjective and disrespectful and a self-righteous anger takes over them. As the pressure becomes intolerable, psychological outlet valves open to release frustration in inappropriate ways: anger bursts, impulsive behaviors, excessive drinking or eating.


    Stressors:


    • dealing with poorly organized situations
    • obstructions to their work
    • emotional and irrational people
    • incompetent people
    • sudden changes in their plans
    • adjusting to new surroundings
    • adopting new ways of doing things

    Stress Response:


    • Excessive criticism; categorical negative judgments about people and events
    • Increasing difficulty listening to input from others
    • Irritability and intolerance of  deviations from the rules
    • Strong emotional outbursts; feelings of vulnerability
    • Excessive sensitivity to feeling alone, left out, unappreciated
    • Withdrawal; hiding tension and feelings
    • Sadism, not caring or not being aware when crushing other people’s feelings
    • Viewing others as weak
    • Closed mindedness, not willing to accept any alternatives



    isfp stress

    MBTI stress

    ISFP

    ISFPs will likely become stressed when they are denied time to spend alone, and they often struggle when they feel overwhelmed by demands placed upon them. They may find it difficult to be in situations where they are forced to do a great deal of specific, data driven, long term planning.  ISFPs also tend to struggle in environments where they feel criticized or unappreciated. When faced with stress overload, which may come from a gross or frequent violation of their deeply held values, spending time in an emotionally toxic and/or excessively critical environment, or worrying that they are about to lose someone or something (relationship, task, etc.) close to them, ISFPs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Extraverted Thinking.

    ISFPs under distress will give a lot of importance to their personal freedom, their choices, their lifestyle and their subjective view of life. Feeling threatened by conforming and the prospect of giving up their ideals, they start rejecting other people’s help and advice, becoming increasingly defensive and dismissive. They may resort to sarcasm, become cryptic or derogatory. As frustration grows, they tend to isolate in order to escape outer influence on them, and live life on the edge of society, refusing to take any logical considerations into account and relying solely on their creative emotions and peculiar worldview.


    Stressors:


    • transgression against their values 
    • Too much extraverting.
    • excessive responsibilities and demands on their time
    • dealing with granular details
    • maintaining and organizing their schedules
    • Criticism
    • feeling unappreciated and under-valued
    • pressure to perform up to other’s standards

    Stress Response:


    • Withdraw, become quiet, and begin noticing physical symptoms of stress
    • Become hypersensitive to imagined slights
    • Avoid or put off  actions that might create discomfort or conflict
    • Become extremely critical of others
    • May find self or others to be terribly incompetent
    • Exaggerated and impulsive directing or organizing of environment or others
    • Hopelessness, sadness
    • Martyr-like attitude
    • Loss of confidence and motivation



    istp stress

    MBTI stress

    ISTP

    ISTPs like autonomy in work and are typically stressed by depending on or being in charge of the quality of another’s work. They also struggle in environments where they lack time alone to work, and/or where they are often immersed in emotionally charged environments. They may often find it difficult to be in situations where there is little challenge or variety in day to day tasks or in places where rules are rigidly enforced. When faced with stress overload, which may come from being confronted with intense emotions, having needs for space and introversion disregarded or disrespected (ex. others barging in without invitation or too frequently), or not having their strongly held values and/or feelings validated, ISTPs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Extraverted Feeling.

    ISTPs have the tendency to resist and reject any requests or situations that do not fit their natural views on life. Afraid of being controlled by others, they protect their freedom by cutting demanding people out of their lives and may start associating themselves solely with those who bear similar, usually antisocial outlooks on things. As the pressure increases, they are very likely to take rebellious stances against society and its organizational systems (government, political parties etc.), whose power they perceive as threatening to their independence.


    Stressors:


    • Being in controlling relationships.
    • dealing with emotional irrational people
    • dealing with abstract theories and concepts
    • intense and emotionally charged people
    • Too much extraverting.
    • boring repetitive work
    • being underestimated or feeling under valued
    • having their values disregarded

    Stress Resp0nse:


    • Withdrawal and quietness, increased irritability
    • Excessive thinking and cogitating with emphasis on logic; increasing insensitivity to others
    • Become very task-oriented and focused on busywork
    • Emotional outbursts
    • Feelings of  not being liked or appreciated
    • Forgetfulness, disorganization, confusion
    • Passive aggressiveness
    • Sarcastic and mean remarks
    • Vagueness, distractibility, disorganization



    esfp stress

    MBTI stress

    ESFP

    When faced with stress overload, which may come from being forced to make commitments or plans in advance, being forced to make decisions or eliminate options before they are ready, or having to spend a lot of time following someone else’s rules and/or schedules, ESFPs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Introverted Intuition.  During this experience, the individual is likely to do things that are typically completely out of character.  This may include having fearful fantasies of the possibilities of impending doom swirling in their minds, like a tornado. They may begin to assign big meaning to small occurrences, and they may become uncharacteristically preoccupied with the meaning of life and the future of mankind or the universe.

    ESFPs are likely to first experience depression and disinterest, as a result of diminished physical and emotional energy. They may become self-absorbed and indifferent towards other’s needs and finally may leave their current situation altogether, in search of a whole new alternative. As the psychological pressure increases, ESFPs may begin acting in a flighty, superficial manner, attracted to the satisfaction of the moment while disregarding the consequences of their actions.


    Stressors:


    • having to plan for the future
    • being tied down by commitments and obligations
    • conflict and criticism
    • feeling not in control of their lives
    • doing things without clear directions or purpose
    • lack of physical stimulation
    • lack of human interaction
    • academics and school work
    • being stuck in one place for extended lengths of time

    Stress Response:


    • Increased talkativeness; feeling confused and/or scattered
    • Begin noticing physical symptoms of  stress; appetite disturbances
    • Excessive fun-seeking behaviors, and avoidance of issues that might create conflict
    • Increased pessimism and negativity; fears about the future
    • Feelings of  confusion and self-doubt; worry and withdrawal
    • Over-interpreting the behavior of  others as mean-spirited
    • Internal confusion
    • Losing touch with reality, sense of impending doom
    • Clinging onto worst case scenarios



    estp stress

    MBTI stress

    ESTP

    When under stress, which may come from being cornered into commitments or plans in advance, being forced to make decisions or eliminate options before they are ready, or having to spend a lot of time following someone else’s rules and/or schedules, ESTPs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Introverted Intuition.  During this experience, the individual is likely to do things that are typically completely out of character.  This may include having fearful fantasies of negative outcomes. They may express paranoid suspicions of impending doom or conspiratorial plots against them.

    ESTPs are used to dealing with their problems and frustrations by searching for more external stimulation and adventure. When their situation is causing them to feel disappointed and restless, ESTPs consider it is time to recreate their successful public persona, by either finding a new audience to charm or resorting to grand gestures that will reinforce their image and make them feel popular again. At the same time, their private life suffers from a deep sense of emptiness and intimacy becomes almost impossible as they become increasingly detached from true emotional connections.


    Stressors:


    • feeling subjugated and beholden to others
    • performing tasks without adequate directions and resources
    • academic work
    • lack of external stimulus
    • being forced into commitments and decisions
    • having their options limited
    • not being allowed to act in the moment
    • negative low energy people

    Stress Response:


    • Increased talkativeness, sense of  pressure, and irritability
    • Increased frankness; insensitivity to people’s feelings
    • Rapid switching among activities; increased pleasure seeking
    • Fears of  disaster and doom; deep significance given to minor events
    • Feelings of  confusion and self-doubt; worry and withdrawal
    • Over-interpreting the behavior of  others as mean-spirited
    • Internal confusion
    • Losing touch with reality, sense of impending doom
    • Clinging onto worst case scenarios



    Mounting stress and pressure can lead to a complete and epic unraveling of our psychological fabric that gives way to a side of ourselves that others despise. How we respond to that stress and the types of stress we are sensitive to will vary from person to person. In the Myers Briggs type theory, each personality type manifests signs of stress in ways particular to them and the sources and causes of it will differ as well. Although there are life conditions that everyone finds to be stressful, the stress responses of some types can be triggered by events and circumstances that a different type may experience as desirable and energizing.

    source: via MBTI Resources
    source: via psychologyjunkie
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    ource: via personalityplaybook
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    ource: via pstypes.blogspot

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