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The Intelligence Each MBTI Type Displays

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mbti smart

Myers Briggs personality types are not a direct reflection of intelligence, but it just so happens that some types statistically perform better than others on standardized intelligence tests (cough INTP).

Even though people of any type can be really smart, there may be certain types of intelligence that each MBTI type specializes in more than others on account of their functional preferences. Here is a look at the type of intellectual strength each MBTI type is likely to display. Continue reading

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  • mbti list Myers Briggs

    How Each MBTI Type Processes Emotions

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    mbti emotions

    For each MBTI personality type, the way in which emotions are processed and dealt with will no doubt differ. Here is a look at how you process emotion according to your Myers Briggs type. Continue reading

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  • article Famous Profiles Myers Briggs

    What is Stefan Molyneux’s MBTI Type?

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    stefan molyneux mbti type

    Stefan Molyneux is a philosopher, author and host of the Freedomain Radio podcast. Since 2006, his youtube channel has amassed a substantial audience with over 225,000,000 views as of Feb 2018. But what is Stefan’s MBTI personality? Here is a look at what MBTI type he might be based on some function stack analysis.

    Introvert or Extravert?

    Molyneux appears to be an extravert. He speaks very fast and seems pretty comfortable with public speaking. He is verbose and seems to relish the practice of communicating to an audience be it live and in person or over an internet broadcast. He is pensive and thoughtful, but on the whole, responds very quickly and doesn’t take very long to process things in his head.  He seems to be comfortable articulating his thoughts out loud. Even introverts who manage to become good public speakers still tend to exhibit more reservation and measuredness in their speaking style than what Molyneux typically shows.

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  • article Famous Profiles Myers Briggs

    Which MBTI type is Jordan B. Peterson?

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    Jordan B. Peterson MBTI

    In 2012, Jordan Peterson tweeted a Washington Post article and wrote “Why the Myers Briggs is a cult: Washington Post gets it right”. Peterson is apparently not a proponent of the Myers-Briggs type indicator. He deems it to be unreliable and has stated in one of his many lecture clips posted on youtube that “The Myers-Briggs has zero predictive utility with regards to performance prediction [in the workplace]”. Instead of the MBTI, he often refers to the Big 5 when discussing psychometric personality traits. Continue reading

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  • article Psychology

    13 Misconceptions & Myths About Introverts

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    Being an introvert can be difficult in part because many people do not quite understand them. Since most of the world is dominated by extroverts and extroverted ideals, people of an introverted disposition often feel forced to adopt a persona that extroverts seem to take for granted as suitable for everyone. Continue reading

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  • article mbti list Myers Briggs

    What Each Myers-Briggs Type Would Do With A Million Dollars

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    “Need money for Bentley” by Saju90

    What would you do if you suddenly struck it rich? How about a million dollars? Many of us could rattle off a number of things we would do with that kind of fortune like buy a bentley and a helicopter, but these days, a million doesn’t go as far as it used to. Here is a look at what each Myers-Briggs type might do with a million dollars.

    INTP

    INTP would likely try to conserve their money initially while they research all the options newly available to them, which may include learning all about investing and the wonderful world of money markets. INTPs may try to use their money to finance the things they’ve always wanted to do such as travel abroad or use their financial freedom to devote all their time towards meaningful pursuits that they previously could not afford to focus on.    

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  • article INFJ INFP mbti list Myers Briggs Relationships

    6 Reasons Why INFP and INFJ Fall In Love

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    On the question of compatibility between Myers Briggs types, it is generally accepted that in matters of romance and friendship, idealists pair best with other idealists. This notion is supported by a study published in the book “Just Your Type” by Tieger and Barron-Tieger (2000). Idealists in the sample reported a higher satisfaction rating with other idealists than with any other temperament group. Continue reading

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  • article mbti list Myers Briggs

    Research Statistics About Each MBTI Personality

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    Research On the MBTI Personality Types

    There have been many MBTI studies designed to test and supplement the psychological typing system with empirical data. Fortunately for us, we benefit from generations of data already collected, and much of it holds up well with Jung’s ideas. More importantly, these studies provide scientific analysis with which to refine and improve understandings of each type including function dynamics and interaction between the types. Here is an assortment of notable statistics and findings about each Myers Briggs type, culled straight from the MBTI Manual.

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  • article Psychology

    A Twisted Sense of Humor May Be A Sign of Intelligence

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    So here’s a joke:

    man walks into a rooftop bar and takes a seat next to another guy. “What are you drinking?” he asks the guy. “Magic beer,” he says. “Oh, yeah? What’s so magical about it?” Then he shows him: He swigs some beer, dives off the roof, flies around the building, then finally returns to his seat with a triumphant smile. “Amazing!” the man says. “Lemme try some of that!” The man grabs the beer. He downs it, leaps off the roof —and plummets 15 stories to the ground. The bartender shakes his head. “You know, you’re a real jerk when you’re drunk, Superman.”


    If that made you lol, then chances are you smart, you really smart…


    Matter fact… maybe you a genius.


    Why? Well according to a January 2017 study published in Cognitive processing Journal, individuals who enjoyed dark humor tested significantly higher on scales of verbal and non-verbal intelligence than those offended by off-color jokes. A research team led by Ulrike Willinger at the Medical University of Vienna gathered a sample comprised of 156 adults and recorded their responses to 12 dark humor cartoons taken from German cartoonist, Uli Stein’s “The Black Book“. Dark humor (also referred as gallows humor) is defined as being “a kind of humor that treats sinister subjects like death, disease, deformity, handicap or warfare with bitter amusement and presents such tragic, distressing or morbid topics in humorous terms.”

    The study rated participants across a number of variables including dark humor comprehension, dark humor preference, aggression, mood disruption, and verbal and non-verbal intelligence. For each cartoon, individuals were asked to rate on a 4-point scale the difficulty of understanding the joke, the vulgarity of it, the level of surprise by the punchline and how well it fit, the novelty of it, their interest in the subject matter, and the amount of pleasure they derived from it. The researchers found that the results pitted participants into 3 highly correlated groups.

    • Group 1: showed moderate black humor comprehension, moderate black humor preference, low aggressiveness, average verbal and non-verbal intelligence and low mood disturbance.
    • Group 2: showed moderate black humor comprehension, low black humor preference, high mood disturbance, average verbal and non-verbal intelligence, and high aggressiveness .
    • Group 3: showed high black humor comprehension and preference, high verbal and non-verbal intelligence, no mood disturbance and low aggressiveness.

    Researchers concluded that the cognitive and emotional complexities involved in processing dark humor allowed people of higher intelligence and calm temperament to better recognize and appreciate the comedy in otherwise upsetting and disturbing content matter. Higher intelligence also correlates with a better ability to use humor as a coping mechanism for dealing with trauma, tragedy and stress.

    Psychologists have long attributed a relationship between humor and intelligence and many theories assert the key concept behind humor is the recognition of incongruity. Humor itself has been described as the resolving of incongruities or a “reconciliation of paradox”. It is believed that much of the same right brain skills involved in problem solving are also required to process and understand jokes. Smarter people are able to process the morbid and disturbing contexts of dark humor without being put off by it and hence comprehend the meaning of the joke enough to enjoy it.

    Here are descriptions of the 12 cartoons used in the study. See if you find them humorous or not.

    Cartoon

    Situation

    Text

    1.

    Santa Claus, standing on a long, thin tail and having some drops of blood under and on both boots, has been giving Christmas presents to a penguin, a dog and a cat, standing in front of him. Having distributed a fish, a dog biscuit and a tuna tin to them, he still has a gift wrapped cheese left in his hands.

    Santa Claus: ‘And who put the cheese on his letter to me?’

    2.

    Death, impersonated by a skeleton in a hooded coat holding an hourglass and a sickle stands at the doorstep of a man’s apartment.

    The man: ‘I am sorry, we do not die at the front door.’

    3.

    Up on a veritable height a man stands at the outer windowsill of an apartment block. Having a noose laid around his neck and a fixed knife directed to his stomach he puts a gun against his head. Beside him on the sill lies an emptied bottle labelled as poison and an envelope. Inside the apartment are two police officers, one of them pointing at the man saying:

    ‘Hey – I know this guy from elementary school. I remember that we called him Eberhard, the efficient.’

    4.

    A man scratching his chin apparently out of confusion is clutching the receiver of a public phone box. The voice coming from the receiver says:

    ‘Here is the answering machine of the self-help association for Alzheimer patients. If you still remember your topic, please speak after the tone.’

    5.

    A general practitioner is explaining the result of a medical test to a couple with her being pregnant:

    ‘To begin with, here is the good news: Your child will always find a parking space.’

    6.

    Four men are standing high up on a bungee jumping platform. One of them is holding a rope fixed on the one end to the platform. The other end of the rope is tied around a leg prosthesis that is turned upside down. One of them is telling the others:

    ‘I didn’t examining his certificate of disability in all detail.’

    7.

    A group of surgeons in an operating theatre is in the middle of what looks like a heart surgery. Without a sign of warning the heart springs out of the patient’s body right into one of the surgeons’ faces. Another surgeon remarks:

    ‘That’s the most amazing case of tissue rejection I’ve ever seen!’

    8.

    In a morgue a physician is lifting a white cover sheet off a body with a woman standing beside him. The woman confirms:

    ‘Sure, that’s my husband – anyway, which washing powder did you use to get that so white?’

    9.

    Two women, apparently real chatterboxes, are having a chat over coffee.

    The first one: ‘He is crippled, she is crippled and what’s more they are going to have a baby.’

    The other one: ‘I do hope things straighten themselves out.’

    10.

    In an operating theatre a surgeon has one arm deep in an opened body. Another surgeon explains the situation to a man in a suit:

    ‘The autopsy is finished; he is only looking for his wrist watch.’

    11.

    A dentist is on a root canal job with the patient being completely tensed up due to pain. At the back of the patient’s chair the tip of a rotating dental drill, apparently having worked its way through the patient’s mouth and neck comes into sight. The dentist asks his patient:

    ‘Does it hurt?’

    12.

    After having committed suicide the body of a man hangs from a light fixture in a living room, hung by his tie. His wife enters the room with a friend and looking at him she complains:

    ‘And once again the green tie with the blue suit. Come on, what have I been nagging him about for all these years?’


    6 twisted jokes to make you LOLOLOL.


    Q: What’s white on the top and black on the bottom?




    A: Society.

    Q: What’s the difference between John Wayne and Jack Daniels?




    A: Jack Daniels is still killing Indians.

    Q: What’s the difference between a garbanzo bean and a chick pea?




    A: I wouldn’t pay 40 bucks to have a garbanzo bean on my face.

    Q: Who’s the opposite of Christopher Reeves?




    A: Christopher Walkin.

    Q: How many potatoes does it take to kill an Irishman?




    A: Zero.

    Q: What did Kermit the Frog say at Jim Henson’s funeral?




    A: Nothing.

     

    Willinger, U., Hergovich, A., Schmoeger, M., Deckert, M., Stoettner, S., Bunda, I., Witting, A., Seidler, M., Moser, R., Kacena, S. and Jaeckle, D., 2017. Cognitive and emotional demands of black humour processing: the role of intelligence, aggressiveness and mood. Cognitive processing, pp.1-9.

    Hauck, W.E. and Thomas, J.W., 1972. The relationship of humor to intelligence, creativity, and intentional and incidental learning. The journal of experimental education, 40(4), pp.52-55.

    Source: If You Laugh at These Dark Jokes, You’re Probably a Genius
    Source: Can Psychology Explain Humor?
    Source: Intelligence & Humor: Are Smarter People Funnier?
    Source: Cognitive and Emotional Demands of Dark Humor Processing: The Role of Intelligence, Aggressiveness and Mood
    S
    ource: If you have a dark sense of humor you might be more intelligent

     

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  • article Psychology

    The Evolution of Psychotherapy | Infographic

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    Learn about the evolution of psychotherapy, past methods of addressing mental illness and future development. As you can see there have been many approaches to treating disorders!

    history of psychotherapy infographic

     

    Image source: Best Counseling Degrees

    The Evolution of Psychotherapy

    It all began with…

    – A Hole in the Head: The earliest form of dealing with the mentally ill was TREPANATION
    – Neolithic period to early 20th Century: Since insanity was “caused” by demons lurking inside the skull, boring a hole in the patient’s head could create a door through which the demons could escape. And just like that – out goes the crazy.
    – Ancient Greeks: had their own early cures for mental illness
    – bathing: early for depression
    – bloodletting: for psychosis

    – FACT: Around 400 B.C.: Hysteria Therapy: Blame Greek physician Hippocrates. The root cause, according to him, was a wandering womb. His cures involved finding a way to “calm down” the uterus. Plato believed that the only sure-fire way to solve the problem was to get married and have babies.

    – Middle Ages: A bit less humane treatment
    – torture: for demonic possession

    Meanwhile, until Freud and his school of talk therapy developed, here are EIGHT other odd Cures actually used to cure Mental Illness in the 19th and 20th Centuries:

    – 1628: Dr. Daniel Oxenbridge a London physician, when trying to cure the young wife of a clothier. First he gave her an enema, and then he bled her arms, her feet, and her forehead. After that, “once every three or four days, I either bled her or vomited her strongly.” He then shaved off all the hair on her head to which he “applied the warm lungs of lambs, sheep and young whelps…”
    – 1774: Mesmerism: Austrian physician Franz Mesmer believed the gravity of the moon affected the body’s fluids in much the same way it caused ocean tides, and that some diseases accordingly waxed and waned with the phases of the moon. Mesmer’s solution: placing magnets on certain areas of a patient’s body to counteract the disruptive influence of the moon’s gravity and restore the normal flow of bodily fluids. Today, he’s considered the father of modern hypnosis because of his inadvertent discovery of the power of suggestion, and his name lives on in the English word “mesmerize.”
    – Around the turn of the 19th century, Phrenology: German physician Franz Gall developed phrenology, a practice based on the idea that people’s personalities are depicted in the bumps and depressions of their skulls.
    – 1811: Rotational Therapy: Joseph Cox invented and Charles Darwin’s grandfather Erasmus Darwin, practiced a spinning couch treatment. The idea was that spinning would reduce brain congestion and, in turn cure mental illness.
    – Early 1820s: Hydrotherapy: Developed by Vinzenz Priessnitz. Hyperactive patients got warm, tiring baths, while lethargic patients received stimulating sprays. One treatment involved mummifying the patient in towels soaked in ice-cold water. Another required the patient to remain continuously submerged in a bath for hours even days.
    – 1853: Psychotherapeia is a term first used by Walter Cooper Dendy
    – 1900: Psychotherapy , as we’ve come to know it, is developed by Austrian Sigmund Freud. It becomes a school called psychoanalysis.
    – And Freud begat: Alfred Adler and Carl Jung (both of whom eventually disagreed with some of Freud’s theories and started branches of psychology of their own.
    – 1927: Insulin Coma Therapy: Viennese physician Manfred Sakel in 1927 accidentally gave one of his diabetic patients an insulin overdose, and it sent her into a coma. The woman, a drug addict, woke up and declared her morphine craving gone. Began in the 1930s. 1934: Seizure therapy. Hungarian pathologist Ladislas von Meduna reasoned that giving schizophrenics seizures would make them calmer. Thus was born electroconvulsive therapy.
    – FACT: In order to do this von Meduna tested numerous seizure-inducing drugs (including strychnine, caffeine, and absinthe) before settling on metrazol, a chemical that stimulates the circulatory and respiratory systems.
    – 1930s: Lobotomy: The brainchild of Egas Moniz, a Portuguese doctor. Moniz believed that mental illness was caused by problems in the neurons of the frontal lobe, the part of the brain just behind the forehead. He believed the technique could cure insanity while leaving the rest of the patient’s mental function relatively normal.
    – FACT: Moniz was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1949.
    – FACT: Dr. Walter Freeman took to traveling the country in his “lobotomobile,” performing the technique on everyone from catatonic schizophrenics to disaffected housewives. His road-ready procedure involved inserting a small ice pick into the brain through the eye socket and wiggling it around a bit.
    – 3,459: number of lobotomies Freeman claimed to have performed.
    – 2,500: of those were done using ice picks.
    – As the number of lobotomies increased, a major problem became apparent. The patients weren’t just calm; they were virtual zombies. The treatment soon fell out of favor.
    – 50,000: number of lobotomies performed in U.S. between 1949 and 1952.
    – By the late 1960s: there were over 60 different types of psychotherapies, ranging from psychodrama (using drama techniques) to guided imagery (using mental pictures and stories).

    Famous people who were lobotomized

    – Rosemary Kennedy, sister of JFK Frances Farmer – actress
    – Naomi Ginsberg – mother of poet Allen Ginsberg
    – Rose Williams – sister of playwright Tennessee Williams

    The Swinging Sixties

    – Esalen Institute in Big Sur, Ca. opens, a new humanistic movement begins:
    – Gestalt Therapy
    – Encounter group therapy
    – 1 million people have gone to this mystical retreat, including: Joan Baez, Beatle George Harrison, physicians Dean Ornish and Andrew Weil, writers Henry Miller and Aldous Huxley.
    – FACT: The mega hit Bob, Carol, Ted and Alice satirized wife swapping therapy.

    FIVE GREAT MOVIES Involving Psychotherapy

    – David and Lisa — A film from the 1960’s shows good examples of the benefit of psychotherapy and the difficulties for the severely ill.
    – Don Juan DeMarco (1995) — Johnny Depp plays a man who becomes a psychiatric inpatient treated with only psychotherapy by his psychiatrist (Marlin Brando), who is increasingly pressured by hospital medical superiors to prescribe drug treatment.
    – Equus – (1977) Stars Richard Burton as a psychiatrist trying to understand a young man who blinded horses during a psychotic episode.
    – Frances (1983)– About Frances Farmer–a movie star who ended up having a lobotomy.
    – Three Faces Of Eve – (1957) – A doctor treats a woman suffering from Dissociative Identity Disorder.

    The Future of Psychotherapy

    – Therapy apps for smartphones: may soon make psychological help accessible anytime, anywhere, whether in the grocery store line, on the bus or just before a work presentation.
    – 2011: e-psychiatry becomes more and more acceptable using Skype and online therapy and videoconferencing. Telepsychiatry has been around since the 1990s. cognitive bias modification, or C.B.M.: Many who struggle with anxiety fixate subconsciously on hostile faces in a crowd of people with mostly relaxed expressions, as if they see only the bad apples in a bushel of mostly good ones. Modifying that bias can short-circuiting anxiety.
    – Video Game Therapy: studies indicate that gamers who take control of their dreams experience fewer nightmares, amongst other unexpected events. Related to that…
    – Avatar Therapy: This innovation in psychotherapy combines artificial intelligence and distance technology with elements of traditional psychotherapeutic techniques.
    – SciFi, or reality?: 20 years from now mind-machine interfaces will be available, through creating a brain implant similar to the way cochlear implants improve hearing today.

    Sources

    – http://www.neatorama.com/2007/06/12/10-mind-boggling-psychiatric-treatments/
    – http://psychcentral.com/lib/history-of-psychotherapy/000115
    – http://thelimbicregion.tripod.com/id38.htm
    – http://laingsociety.org/cetera/timeline.htm
    – http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080826174337AAjiAnF
    – http://fritzperls.com/biography/
    – http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5014565
    – http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-an-encounter-group.htm
    – http://www.isps-us.org/isps-us_bibliographies_movies.html
    – http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/25/fashion/therapists-are-seeing-patients-online.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0
    – http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/14/health/feeling-anxious-soon-there-will-be-an-app-for-that.html?_r=2&hpw&
    – http://www.sfgate.com/living/article/Esalen-Institute-turns-50-this-year-3906021.php
    – http://blogs.voanews.com/digital-frontiers/2012/10/02/video-games-the-future-of-psychotherapy/
    – http://thefutureofinnovation.org/contributions/view/893/the_future_of_innovation_the_use_of_avatars_in_psychotherapy
    – http://www.positivefuturist.com/archive/02.html

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  • list Myers Briggs Psychology quiz

    Epic List Of 100 Free Personality Tests On The Internet

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    Here is a collection of psychological tests designed to assess various aspects of personality. Continue reading

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  • article Astrology Psychology

    20 Carl Jung Quotes On Astrology

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  • article Psychology

    10 Telltale Signs You’re Being Lied To

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    Most of us can tell when we are being lied to, but sometimes liars have ways of fooling us which can lead to trouble. Here are some telltale signs of a deceptive person. Continue reading

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  • article Psychology Relationships

    The Neuroscience Behind Breakups

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    The end of a relationship is one of the toughest, most difficult emotional experiences most people will face in life. Breakups can be just as devastating as the formation of a new relationship is euphoric. The roller coaster of emotion and uncharacteristic irrational behavior that often follows a breakup has been an object of study for neuroscientists. Continue reading

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  • INTJ Reblogged

    30 Struggles All INTJs Can Understand

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    Every Myers Briggs type has their particular share of troubles. The INTJ personality types, as brilliant as they are, encounter a range of difficulties that provide a steady source of turbulence and frustration for them. Many of these problems occupy the realm of social life and the INTJ’s inadequacy and disregard thereof. The INTJ’s harsh scrutiny  and wanton contempt for the sort of vapid and meaningless rituals revered and perpetuated by popular culture puts them at odds with the majority of society. Making up only 2% of the general population, it is no wonder why they are so contrarian and out of touch with the rest of the world.

    On top of that, INTJs are emotionally impaired which contributes to most of their relationship woes. Their lack of emotional availability often does not fulfill the emotional needs of most other types. Although they can sometimes appear like robotic sociopaths, INTJs do possess emotional depth and experience feelings as others do. However, their intensely logical and rational minds temper and inhibit irratic displays of emotion. INTJs would rather address their feelings with logic and subject their own emotions as well as that of others to the same process of dispassionate assessment to understand why and seek pragmatic solutions.

    Here is a list of 30 Struggles All INTJs Can Understand.

    INTJ struggles, intuitive, thinking, judging, and myers brigg.

    Source: 30 Struggles All INTJs Can Understand

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