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About Jhoon

Jhoon is a writer and artist who likes to study astrology and psychology. Astroligion.com was launched in 2016 with a focus on astrology but has since expanded to include the MBTI and other topics. This site has provided Jhoon a great incentive to research and learn more about many subjects of personal interest.

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MBTI Stress | The 16 Types When Overwhelmed With Stress

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mbti stress

“Big small world” by adrianismyname – mbti stress

MBTI Stress

[dropcap]M[/dropcap]ounting stress and pressure can lead to a complete and epic unraveling of our psychological fabric that gives way to a side of ourselves that others despise. How we respond to that stress and the types of stress we are sensitive to will vary from person to person. In the Myers Briggs type theory, each personality type manifests signs of stress in ways particular to them and the sources and causes of it will differ as well. Although there are life conditions that everyone finds to be stressful, the stress responses of some types can be triggered by events and circumstances that a different type may experience as desirable and energizing.

intp stress

mbti stress

INTP

[dropcap]U[/dropcap]nder extreme stress, INTPs will become hyper critical of other’s expectations and demands, while simultaneously craving their affection and appreciation. INTP’s thoughts will grow increasingly complicated and disconnected from objective reality, instead focusing on largely subjective and paranoid interpretations of the events occurring around them. Frustrations will lead INTPs to develop various phobias and psychosomatic fears, becoming uncharacteristically concerned with their physical health and the effect that their environment can have on it

When stressed out, INTP’s intense emotions will come to the surface. Major triggers for this include having their need for space and introversion violated and disrespected (ex. others intruding on their space and uninvited visitors), or having their principles and convictions trampled on. Under these circumstances, INTPs will likely find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Extraverted Feeling.  At this point, INTPs are likely to behave completely out of character.  They will become more emotionally engaged and obsessed with their logic and will be more argumentative, while at the same time becoming increasingly disorganized and forgetful of mundane matters. INTPs may become hypersensitive and take insignificant details and remarks more personally than normal. They may develop the belief that others dislike or hate them, and they may become uncharacteristically emotional and bitter.


Stressors:


  • Being boxed in and constrained by responsibilities
  • Being forced to do un-challenging and repetitive work
  • Working with incompetent, chatty people
  • Teamwork
  • Supervising others and monitoring their work
  • Too much extraverting
  • Emotionally charged situations
  • Being underappreciated for their abilities and contribution
  • People invading their space
  • INTP money issues

Stress Response:


  • Withdrawal and quietness; increased irritability
  • Excessive thinking and cogitating with emphasis on logic; paralysis of analysis
  • Intellectually combative and increasingly insensitive to emotional climate
  • Emotional outbursts
  • Feelings of not being liked or appreciated
  • Forgetfulness, disorganization, confusion
  • Passive aggressiveness
  • Sarcastic and mean remarks
  • Vagueness, distractibility, disorganization



intj stress

mbti stress

INTJ

Typically INTJ’s get peeved and discontented in environments where their intellectual prowess is not valued or appreciated. INTJs get drained in places full of noisy, boisterous people and when being forced to extravert themselves too much with little to no “alone time” to replenish their energy.  INTJs will also have little patience when working with people they deem to be lazy and incompetent. They quickly tire of tasks that require ample attention to detail with specific repetitive procedures and methods.

INTJs are accustomed to living in their internal world at the expense of their physical and emotional needs. Romantic feelings can take them by surprise and destabilize their psychological balance. Because they feel their emotional impulses threaten their sense of self-control they often resort to denial of their existence and attempt to rationalize their emotions with logic and principles that do not even apply.


Stressors:


  • Noisy boisterous environments
  • Lazy incompetent co-workers
  • Meticulous robotic work
  • New environments
  • Having to change their plans
  • Too much focus on the present
  • Not enough time to think ahead

Stress Response:


  • Withdraw into the inner world of  images and possibilities; become quiet
  • Stubbornness and increased irritability
  • Become very busy; focus on low priority tasks
  • Become obsessively concerned with detail;paralysis of  analysis
  • Angry and critical at people and/or things
  • Over focused on gratifying the senses
  • Elitism; “I know everything, you know nothing”
  • Overdoing sensory activities like drinking, cleaning, working out etc.
  • Intense anger
  • INTJ depression



entp stress

MBTI stress

ENTP

In most cases, ENTPs will be averse to environments wherever creativity is restricted or stifled.  ENTPs become stressed when they are deprived of external stimulation, denied autonomy, or are forced to commit themselves to binding decisions for which they have little wiggle room. They are also stressed by environments that do not appreciate their originality and clever ideas.

When stressed, ENTPs will become flighty and will start to look for the nearest exit for fear that their freedom is at stake. They become impulsive and coquettish and justify their behavior so as to avoid perceived entrapment. ENTPs become increasingly defiant as pressure and responsibilities mount while at the same becoming ever more dependent on others to help them with managing various aspects of their duties.


Stressors:


  • Lack of external stimulus
  • Feeling restricted and controlled
  • Having their creativity stifled
  • Being forced to make long term decisions
  • Working with individuals they view as incompetent
  • Having their cleverness go unappreciated
  • Having their principles violated
  • Working with mundane details
  • Overextending themselves

Stress Response:


  • Excessive flow of  exciting new ideas without evaluation
  • Increased impatience, irritability, frankness, insensitivity, and debating
  • Over-involvement in numerous activities; stretched thin
  • Become obsessive, picky, and compulsive
  • Withdrawal, immobility, depression
  • Excessive and exaggerated worry about bodily sensations
  • Anxiety
  • Irritability, upset about insignificant things
  • Self-deprecation



ENTJ

When experiencing stress, ENTJs may fall “under the grip” of their inferior function, Introverted Feeling. This may emerge in response to intense emotions stemming from guilt over criticism of others, or having their strong values and/or feelings violated. When this happens, ENTJs are likely to exhibit behavior that is unlike them including uncharacteristic emotional outbursts and isolating themselves away from others while they try to restore control over their psychological balance.

ENTJs are inclined to believe that the source of their distress lies outside of themselves and therefore they’re quick to blames others for their problems. They perceive other people as being needy and illogical, and also systems and organizations as inefficient and hindering. Everything and everyone seems to be holding them back, therefore they feel compelled to take matters into their own hands and set things right.


Stressors:


  • Disruptions to their plans.
  • A Lack of results despite their hard efforts
  • Feeling incompetent
  • Lazy unmotivated people
  • Being in a subordinate roles
  • Inability to realize their goals
  • Hypersensitive emotional people
  • Feelings of guilt for criticizing others
  • Having their values and principles violated
  • Idleness and wasting of time.
  • Missed opportunities

Stress Response:


  • Excessive criticism; categorical negative judgments about people and events
  • Increased irritability, sense of  pressure and anxiety, impatience, and insensitivity
  • Increasing tunnel vision and difficulty listening to input from others
  • Feeling out of  control; distress at possibly losing control
  • Strong emotional outbursts; feelings of vulnerability; withdrawal
  • Excessive sensitivity to feeling alone, left out, unappreciated
  • Sadism, not caring or not being aware when crushing other people’s feelings
  • Viewing others as weak
  • Closed mindedness, not willing to accept any alternatives



INFP

When experiencing stress overload, which may come from a gross or frequent violation of their deeply held values, spending time in an emotionally toxic and/or excessively critical environment, or worrying that they are about to lose someone or something (relationship, task, etc.) close to them, INFPs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Extraverted Thinking.  During this experience, the individual is likely to do things that are typically completely out of character.

INFPs usually dislike conflict and are prone to acting in a passive-aggressive way when they experience frustration or dissatisfaction. They are deeply dedicated to being their ‘true selves’, to the extent that they will avoid any people or situations that do not fit in with their inner value system, tending to become rather intolerant and hard to please. As stress increases, they may become extremely whimsical and stubborn, insisting on acting as they feel but ignoring the logical consequences and implications of their actions.


Stressors:


  • Inflexible schedules and routines
  • Violations of their values
  • Being in rowdy boisterous environments
  • Extraverting themselves too much
  • small talk and glib exchanges
  • disingenuous people
  • restrictions to their creativity
  • being tied down and working on highly detailed tasks

Stress Response:


  • Withdraw, become preoccupied; begin noticing difficulty sleeping and increased eating
  • Become hypersensitive to imagined slights
  • Avoid or put off  actions that might create discomfort or conflict
  • Become extremely critical of  others
  • May find self  or others to be terribly incompetent
  • Exaggerated and impulsive directing or organizing of  environment or others
  • Hopelessness, sadness
  • Martyr-like attitude
  • Loss of confidence and motivation



INFJ

When faced with stress overload, which may come from dealing with unfamiliar environments with overwhelming amounts of details, having to extravert too much or in uncomfortable ways, or having their well settled plans disrupted, INFJs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Extraverted Sensing.  In this state, the individual is likely to do things that are typically completely out of character.  This may include over doing it on the pleasures of the senses by binge-eating, over-exercising, buying lots of useless items, etc..

INFJs tend to withdraw from reality into a fantasy world of their own, which gradually gains importance as they become dissatisfied with their real life and the people in it. While fulfilling the demands of their outer commitments, they harbor secret criticism and the feeling that their imaginary world and the characters that inhabit it are more important than the actual people in their lives.


Stressors:


  • discord in their relationships
  • violations of their values
  • excessive extraverting
  • Being amongst close-minded people
  • Feeling under appreciated and under-valued
  • Adjusting to new environments
  • disruptions to their plans
  • Lack of direction and purpose
  • Disharmony and conflict

Stress Response:


  • Withdraw into the inner world of  images and possibilities; become quiet
  • Moodiness and perfectionism
  • Become very busy; focus on low priority tasks
  • Become obsessively concerned with detail; feeling out of  control
  • Angry and critical at people and/or things
  • Over focused on gratifying the senses
  • Elitism; “I know everything, you know nothing”
  • Overdoing sensory activities like drinking, cleaning, working out etc.
  • Intense anger



ENFP

When confronted with stressful situations, which may come from working in environments where their values are violated, having to focus for long periods of time on mundane details, and good old fashion exhaustion (often caused by overextending oneself), ENFPs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Introverted Sensing.  During this experience, the individual is likely to do things that are typically completely out of character such as splitting hairs over petty details and a reluctance to try anything new. This may include a reduced creativity and withdrawing into themselves and becoming depressed.

ENFPs in distress tend to feel overloaded and overwhelmed by too much to do. They feel they’re trying to help others and make their lives better but their efforts are unappreciated and there are always more expectations and demands. In such situations, ENFPs are likely to start shirking their responsibilities, forgetting their appointments or being late for the deadlines.


Stressors:


  • micromanaging and being micromanaged
  • being forced to focus on the here and now
  • having to follow restrictive regimens and routines
  • not being allowed to be creative
  • lack of external stimulus
  • fulfilling deadlines
  • Criticism
  • Lack of appreciation
  • Working within a highly structured, rigid, detail-oriented environment
  • Being required to do something that violates your values
  • Feeling distrusted, disrespected, ignored, not recognized
  • Receiving criticism about yourself or what you have created
  • Finding that you are unable to fulfill the multiple demands you have taken on yourself

Stress Response:


  • Excessive flow of  exciting new ideas without evaluation
  • Increasing disorganization, impatience, and forgetfulness
  • Over-involvement in numerous activities;stretched thin
  • Become obsessive, picky, and compulsive
  • Withdrawal and isolation with depression
  • Excessive and exaggerated worry about bodily sensations
  • Anxiety
  • Irritability, upset about insignificant things
  • Self-deprecation
  • Obsessing about irrelevant details and facts
  • Focusing excessively on their body, imagining that they have some dire illness
  • Being irritable, snappish, impatient
  • Feeling depressed, hopeless; withdrawing
  • Failing to see any possibilities beyond their current, dismal reality
  • Being pessimistic and incapable of seeing the big picture
  • Engaging in inflexible, rigid thinking



ENFJ

When faced with stress overload, which may come from being expected to conform with something that goes against their values, spending time in an emotionally toxic, combative, and/or excessively critical environment, or being in an environment where there is a basic lack of trust between individuals, ENFJs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Introverted Thinking.  When this occurs, the individual is likely to do things that are typically completely out of character such as exhibiting indecision and excessive procrastination and overthinking.  They may also lash out at others, and become overly critical of mistakes committed by both themselves and others.

ENFJs are likely to start feeling somewhat disappointed with the relationships they worked so hard to build. They experience a lack of enthusiasm and passion about the people around them and as a consequence they feel guilty about it, believing that they’re losing themselves and letting down their loved ones. Acutely concerned with being seen as empathetic, loving people and highly sensitive to rejection and criticism, they strive to maintain appearances even though deep inside they may feel rather joyless.


Stressors:


  • disharmony
  • obstructions to their plans
  • deadlines
  • intense environments and working conditions
  • boring repetitive tasks
  • having to conform and go against their standards
  • absorbing other people’s stress
  • Being misunderstood or mistrusted
  • fear of not living up to their potential

Stress Response:


  • Over attentive to others’ feelings—trying to make things “right” with others or trying to fix others’ perceived difficulties
  • Inflexibility and increasing difficulty seeing/trying new approaches
  • Begin noticing physical symptoms of stress;appetite disturbances
  • Extreme criticism, even condemnation, of others based on small events
  • Black-and-white thinking, confusion, needing assurance of  the “one” right answer
  • Withdrawal, criticism of  self, lack of  concern for your impact on others
  • Feeling unappreciated, taken for granted
  • General sadness, withdrawal
  • Frequent mood swings



isfj stress

MBTI stress

ISFJ

When laden with stress overload, which may come from dealing with unfamiliar territory and uncertain futures, dealing with others who seem to work outside of the current reality, or having to overuse their type by being expected to constantly act as “the responsible one”, ISFJs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Extraverted Intuition.  During this experience, the individual is likely to do things that are typically completely out of character such as perceiving slights and offenses that are more imagined than actual.  They may also become at odds with the facts and details they normally depend on. to the extent such details are interpreted as being ominous.

ISFJs have the tendency to lose themselves in emotional and moral commitments, seeing themselves as indispensable to and intrinsic part of the cause they’ve identified with. At this point they can become self-sacrificing martyrs whose only purpose is the happiness and well-being of others. They can end up in bad relationships where they’re willingly being used and put in a service-oriented position. As their stress increases they begin to cling to people and try to keep them attached by undermining their independence and offering them unconditional care and support instead.


Stressors:


  • feeling under appreciated and under valued
  • tense environments
  • tight deadlines
  • being overloaded with too many tasks
  • feeling like the only one who is responsible
  • dealing with abstract concepts
  • adjusting to new things, and people

Stress Response:


  • Nose to the grindstone; increased irritability and sense of  pressure
  • Stubbornness; over focus on detail and organizing
  • Withdrawal and increased quietness; fatigue and other physical symptoms
  • Feelings of  loss of control or confusion
  • Excessive doom saying; anticipation of only negative futures
  • Unusually impulsive behavior
  • General negativity
  • Blaming others without a reason
  • Unusual impulsivity and spontanity



ISTJ

When faced with stress overload, which may come from dealing with unfamiliar territory and uncertain futures, dealing with others who seem to work outside of the current reality, or having to overuse their type by being expected to constantly act as “the responsible one”, ISTJs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Extraverted Intuition.  During this experience, the individual is likely to do things that are typically completely out of character such as interpreting bizarre meanings and focusing on negative possibilities rather than the present reality.

As the pressure rises, they become increasingly intolerant of diversity and may start seeing other people as irresponsible and lacking appropriate standards and ethics. They try to take control of others and become stuck in limiting rules and regulations, afraid of change and taking any risks into the unknown.


Stressors:


  • dealing with problems for which their past experience is of no use
  • having to improvise
  • too much extraverting
  • emotionally intense situations
  • disorganized environments
  • tight dealines
  • deviating from established methods and trying new approaches
  • Being asked to do something without a plan or direction
  • being in unfamiliar surroundings

Stress Response:


  • Nose to the grindstone; increased irritability
  • Stubbornness; over focus on detail and organizing
  • Withdrawal and increased quietness
  • Feelings of  loss of  control or confusion
  • Excessive doom saying; anticipation of only negative futures
  • Unusually impulsive behavior
  • General negativity
  • Blaming others without a reason
  • Unusual impulsivity and spontanity



esfj stress

MBTI stress

ESFJ

When faced with stress overload, which may come from being expected to conform with something that goes against their values, spending time in an emotionally toxic, combative, and/or excessively critical environment, or being in an environment where there is a basic lack of trust between individuals, ESFJs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Introverted Thinking.  During this experience, the individual is likely to do things that are typically completely out of character such as over-analyzing problems and exhibiting indecision. They may also become highly critical of others logic and thus lash out at them, focusing on their mistakes and perceived lack of competence, and flaws.

ESFJs usually keep their distress and inner conflicts away from public eye. They are terrified of being judged and criticized by others while on the other hand they can be highly intolerant of what they perceive as inappropriate behaviors. They begin to feel used and unappreciated by others and as their resentment grows, they are prone to rash and thoughtless actions that may end up damaging the relationships they care so much for.


Stressors:


  • lack of structure in the workplace
  • dealing with abstract concepts
  • interpersonal conflict
  • sudden changes to their plans
  • tight dealines
  • disharmony in their relationships
  • conflicts and violations of their values
  • feeling unappreciated and unsupported by others
  • Criticism

Stress Response:


  • Over attentive to others’ feelings; trying to make things “right” with others or trying to fix others’ perceived difficulties
  • Inflexibility and increasing difficulty seeing or trying new approaches
  • Begin noticing physical symptoms of  stress;appetite disturbances
  • Extreme criticism, even condemnation, of others based on small events
  • Black-and-white thinking, difficulty thinking clearly, confusion
  • Withdrawal, criticism of self, feeling inadequate
  • Feeling unappreciated, taken for granted
  • General sadness, withdrawal
  • Frequent mood swings



estj stress

MBTI stress

ESTJ

When burdened with stress, which may come from being confronted with intense emotions, feeling guilt over being critical towards others, or not having their strongly held values and/or feelings validated, ESTJs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Introverted Feeling.  When this happens, the individual is likely to do things that are typically completely uncharacteristic such as pontificating and exhibiting self righteous behavior.  They may also have emotional outbursts and withdraw from others to conceal their emotional instability. ESTJs may become overly sensitive regarding their relationships and interpret tiny, inconsequential details as signs that others dislike or hate them.

ESTJs are likely to start viewing others as being overly subjective and weak, therefore consider that it’s time to take control and set things right. They can become domineering and uncompromising, imposing their viewpoint and considering their logic as the only valid standard. Craving personal contact and affection, but unable to give in to their emotional side, they blame others for being corrupt, subjective and disrespectful and a self-righteous anger takes over them. As the pressure becomes intolerable, psychological outlet valves open to release frustration in inappropriate ways: anger bursts, impulsive behaviors, excessive drinking or eating.


Stressors:


  • dealing with poorly organized situations
  • obstructions to their work
  • emotional and irrational people
  • incompetent people
  • sudden changes in their plans
  • adjusting to new surroundings
  • adopting new ways of doing things

Stress Response:


  • Excessive criticism; categorical negative judgments about people and events
  • Increasing difficulty listening to input from others
  • Irritability and intolerance of  deviations from the rules
  • Strong emotional outbursts; feelings of vulnerability
  • Excessive sensitivity to feeling alone, left out, unappreciated
  • Withdrawal; hiding tension and feelings
  • Sadism, not caring or not being aware when crushing other people’s feelings
  • Viewing others as weak
  • Closed mindedness, not willing to accept any alternatives



isfp stress

MBTI stress

ISFP

ISFPs will likely become stressed when they are denied time to spend alone, and they often struggle when they feel overwhelmed by demands placed upon them. They may find it difficult to be in situations where they are forced to do a great deal of specific, data driven, long term planning.  ISFPs also tend to struggle in environments where they feel criticized or unappreciated. When faced with stress overload, which may come from a gross or frequent violation of their deeply held values, spending time in an emotionally toxic and/or excessively critical environment, or worrying that they are about to lose someone or something (relationship, task, etc.) close to them, ISFPs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Extraverted Thinking.

ISFPs under distress will give a lot of importance to their personal freedom, their choices, their lifestyle and their subjective view of life. Feeling threatened by conforming and the prospect of giving up their ideals, they start rejecting other people’s help and advice, becoming increasingly defensive and dismissive. They may resort to sarcasm, become cryptic or derogatory. As frustration grows, they tend to isolate in order to escape outer influence on them, and live life on the edge of society, refusing to take any logical considerations into account and relying solely on their creative emotions and peculiar worldview.


Stressors:


  • transgression against their values 
  • Too much extraverting.
  • excessive responsibilities and demands on their time
  • dealing with granular details
  • maintaining and organizing their schedules
  • Criticism
  • feeling unappreciated and under-valued
  • pressure to perform up to other’s standards

Stress Response:


  • Withdraw, become quiet, and begin noticing physical symptoms of stress
  • Become hypersensitive to imagined slights
  • Avoid or put off  actions that might create discomfort or conflict
  • Become extremely critical of others
  • May find self or others to be terribly incompetent
  • Exaggerated and impulsive directing or organizing of environment or others
  • Hopelessness, sadness
  • Martyr-like attitude
  • Loss of confidence and motivation



istp stress

MBTI stress

ISTP

ISTPs like autonomy in work and are typically stressed by depending on or being in charge of the quality of another’s work. They also struggle in environments where they lack time alone to work, and/or where they are often immersed in emotionally charged environments. They may often find it difficult to be in situations where there is little challenge or variety in day to day tasks or in places where rules are rigidly enforced. When faced with stress overload, which may come from being confronted with intense emotions, having needs for space and introversion disregarded or disrespected (ex. others barging in without invitation or too frequently), or not having their strongly held values and/or feelings validated, ISTPs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Extraverted Feeling.

ISTPs have the tendency to resist and reject any requests or situations that do not fit their natural views on life. Afraid of being controlled by others, they protect their freedom by cutting demanding people out of their lives and may start associating themselves solely with those who bear similar, usually antisocial outlooks on things. As the pressure increases, they are very likely to take rebellious stances against society and its organizational systems (government, political parties etc.), whose power they perceive as threatening to their independence.


Stressors:


  • Being in controlling relationships.
  • dealing with emotional irrational people
  • dealing with abstract theories and concepts
  • intense and emotionally charged people
  • Too much extraverting.
  • boring repetitive work
  • being underestimated or feeling under valued
  • having their values disregarded

Stress Resp0nse:


  • Withdrawal and quietness, increased irritability
  • Excessive thinking and cogitating with emphasis on logic; increasing insensitivity to others
  • Become very task-oriented and focused on busywork
  • Emotional outbursts
  • Feelings of  not being liked or appreciated
  • Forgetfulness, disorganization, confusion
  • Passive aggressiveness
  • Sarcastic and mean remarks
  • Vagueness, distractibility, disorganization



esfp stress

MBTI stress

ESFP

When faced with stress overload, which may come from being forced to make commitments or plans in advance, being forced to make decisions or eliminate options before they are ready, or having to spend a lot of time following someone else’s rules and/or schedules, ESFPs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Introverted Intuition.  During this experience, the individual is likely to do things that are typically completely out of character.  This may include having fearful fantasies of the possibilities of impending doom swirling in their minds, like a tornado. They may begin to assign big meaning to small occurrences, and they may become uncharacteristically preoccupied with the meaning of life and the future of mankind or the universe.

ESFPs are likely to first experience depression and disinterest, as a result of diminished physical and emotional energy. They may become self-absorbed and indifferent towards other’s needs and finally may leave their current situation altogether, in search of a whole new alternative. As the psychological pressure increases, ESFPs may begin acting in a flighty, superficial manner, attracted to the satisfaction of the moment while disregarding the consequences of their actions.


Stressors:


  • having to plan for the future
  • being tied down by commitments and obligations
  • conflict and criticism
  • feeling not in control of their lives
  • doing things without clear directions or purpose
  • lack of physical stimulation
  • lack of human interaction
  • academics and school work
  • being stuck in one place for extended lengths of time

Stress Response:


  • Increased talkativeness; feeling confused and/or scattered
  • Begin noticing physical symptoms of  stress; appetite disturbances
  • Excessive fun-seeking behaviors, and avoidance of issues that might create conflict
  • Increased pessimism and negativity; fears about the future
  • Feelings of  confusion and self-doubt; worry and withdrawal
  • Over-interpreting the behavior of  others as mean-spirited
  • Internal confusion
  • Losing touch with reality, sense of impending doom
  • Clinging onto worst case scenarios



estp stress

MBTI stress

ESTP

When under stress, which may come from being cornered into commitments or plans in advance, being forced to make decisions or eliminate options before they are ready, or having to spend a lot of time following someone else’s rules and/or schedules, ESTPs may find themselves “in the grip” of their inferior function, Introverted Intuition.  During this experience, the individual is likely to do things that are typically completely out of character.  This may include having fearful fantasies of negative outcomes. They may express paranoid suspicions of impending doom or conspiratorial plots against them.

ESTPs are used to dealing with their problems and frustrations by searching for more external stimulation and adventure. When their situation is causing them to feel disappointed and restless, ESTPs consider it is time to recreate their successful public persona, by either finding a new audience to charm or resorting to grand gestures that will reinforce their image and make them feel popular again. At the same time, their private life suffers from a deep sense of emptiness and intimacy becomes almost impossible as they become increasingly detached from true emotional connections.


Stressors:


  • feeling subjugated and beholden to others
  • performing tasks without adequate directions and resources
  • academic work
  • lack of external stimulus
  • being forced into commitments and decisions
  • having their options limited
  • not being allowed to act in the moment
  • negative low energy people

Stress Response:


  • Increased talkativeness, sense of  pressure, and irritability
  • Increased frankness; insensitivity to people’s feelings
  • Rapid switching among activities; increased pleasure seeking
  • Fears of  disaster and doom; deep significance given to minor events
  • Feelings of  confusion and self-doubt; worry and withdrawal
  • Over-interpreting the behavior of  others as mean-spirited
  • Internal confusion
  • Losing touch with reality, sense of impending doom
  • Clinging onto worst case scenarios



Mounting stress and pressure can lead to a complete and epic unraveling of our psychological fabric that gives way to a side of ourselves that others despise. How we respond to that stress and the types of stress we are sensitive to will vary from person to person. In the Myers Briggs type theory, each personality type manifests signs of stress in ways particular to them and the sources and causes of it will differ as well. Although there are life conditions that everyone finds to be stressful, the stress responses of some types can be triggered by events and circumstances that a different type may experience as desirable and energizing.

source: via MBTI Resources
source: via psychologyjunkie
source: via Tumblr
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ource: via personalityplaybook
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ource: via pstypes.blogspot

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  • article mbti list Myers Briggs

    How Each Myers Briggs Type Reacts To Conflict

    Published by:

    riddled with conflict
    by collien

    While each of the MBTI preferences influences how people approach and respond to conflict, research has shown that the preferences represented by the last two letters in the four-letter MBTI type code have the greatest impact on one’s conflict style. These letters are called the conflict pairs, and they represent the combination of one’s decision-making preference for either Thinking (T) or Feeling (F) and one’s lifestyle preference for either Judging (J) or Perceiving (P).




    ISTP

    ISTPs are not afraid of conflict and they are not easily intimidated or threatened by confrontation. In most cases, especially in their public lives, ISTPs are not likely to respond to situations emotionally, but rather stoically, with a focus on understanding the issue and gathering information. They are willing to compromise when they can and they take criticism rather well, at least when it’s coming from people they respect. 

    In the midst of crisis they have the ability to perform decisively and skillfully. They seem to have a high tolerance for stress, but when they reach their limits, they can blow up in heated anger. Those close to them may know this aspect unfortunately because ISTPs can sometimes take their pent up frustration out on loved ones. This is especially true when they feel double-bound or restricted in their relationships. Fortunately, ISTPs tend not to hold on to grudges and are happy to move past the drama.

    • Likely cause of conflict: Challenges to trust
    • Desired outcome: Defined process or progression
    • Deal with emotions by: Excluding them
    • Others’ impression: Catalyst of or contributor to conflict
    • Satisfied when: The outcome can subsequently be analyzed



    ISFP

    While ISFPs typically dislike conflict, they are often not in a rush to reach closure as they appreciate the time needed to listen to everyone.  They have difficulty with others offering a logical analysis that appears to overlook the possible negative impact on others.  For FPs, conflict issues tend to involve something they are passionate about, be it a value or people who are important to them. The amount of time ISFPs spend exploring people’s concerns can be frustrating for TJs, whom they perceive as impatient to move on. Their intention is to have everyone’s opinions, feelings, and values respected. Including others is often more important than the issue.  You are naturally sensitive to any conflict around you. Success for you is achieved when you or others create a safe environment to allow an exploration of all viewpoints.

    • Likely cause of conflict: Challenges to values
    • Desired outcome: Respectful listening
    • Deal with emotions by: Accepting them
    • Others’ impression: Someone who includes others’ values and concerns
    • Satisfied when: There is open exploration



    ESFP

    ESFPs are likely to be viewed in conflict as people who seek to hear all sides of the story. Others typically see them as being accepting of disparate views and committed to their own values. For FPs, conflict issues tend to involve something they are passionate about, be it a value or people who are important to them. While ESFPs would not typically want to engage in conflict, they accept that it is necessary when they care so much about who or what is involved. Throughout a conflict, ESFPs have a strong need to include the opinions and feelings of everyone. They are naturally sensitive to any conflict around them. Success for for the ESFP is achieved when they or others create a safe environment to allow an exploration of all viewpoints.

    • Likely cause of conflict: Challenges to values
    • Desired outcome: Respectful listening
    • Deal with emotions by: Accepting them
    • Others’ impression: Someone who includes others’ values and concerns
    • Satisfied when: There is open exploration



    ESTP

    As ESTPs’ tolerance of conflict situations is higher than that of most people, don’t be surprised if they see conflict as a challenge or as healthy. Remember that for them, the process of addressing the conflict is as important as the outcome. ESTPs’ comfort with exploring means they will be in no rush to reach closure. ESTPs will express feelings only when they are sure everyone present can be trusted. ESTPs may frustrate others with their seemingly ever-changing rules of engagement. They are acutely aware of where the power lies in any situation and will fluctuate between needing to have access to the power and supporting the underdog. Their intention is to ensure the conflict has been explored from all angles.

    • Likely cause of conflict: Challenges to trust
    • Desired outcome: Defined process or progression
    • Deal with emotions by: Excluding them
    • Others’ impression: Catalyst of or contributor to conflict
    • Satisfied when: The outcome can subsequently be analyzed



    ISTJ

    They may tend to overlook the emotional content in conflict even though strong emotion does exist. Their engagement can shift from easygoing and agreeable to intense and seemingly angry, all within the same situation. This paradox could be the root of the changeable intensity those with TJ preferences can show—holding back emotion for a time, then having it burst out, albeit for a short period. Success in a conflict is measured not by whether their particular viewpoint prevails, but by the clear identification of a viewpoint as a way forward.

    • Likely cause of conflict: Challenges to authority
    • Desired outcome: Closure or resolution
    • Deal with emotions by: Denying they exist
    • Others’ impression: Detached or aggressive adversary
    • Satisfied when: Conflict is over



    ISFJ

    ISFJs typically view conflict as a difficult or negative experience.  Their rush to closure is likely motivated by a desire to make sure no one gets hurt rather than an objective assessment that everything is sorted out. It is only after ISFJs are certain everyone’s concerns and feelings have been given attention that they can begin to look at other factors. Once engaged in a conflict, FJs can be intense and emotional and will encourage others to share their feelings and opinions in the hope that this will lead to a resolution. Typically they will equate success in a conflict with the relationships remaining intact and there being no lingering bitterness.

    • Likely cause of conflict: Challenges to beliefs
    • Desired outcome: Intact relationships
    • Deal with emotions by: Including them
    • Others’ impression: Seeker of communication and harmony
    • Satisfied when: There is no lingering bitterness



    ESTJ

    For TJs, conflict tends to arise around authority issues. Questioning of hierarchy, reporting lines, seniority, and decision-making roles can be a red flag for them. When they are involved in a conflict, their primary need is for closure or resolution—to have it over and done with. They may tend to overlook the emotional content in conflict even though strong emotion does exist. Their engagement can shift from easygoing and agreeable to intense and seemingly angry, all within the same situation. This paradox could be the root of the changeable intensity those with TJ preferences can show—holding back emotion for a time, then having it burst out, albeit for a short period. Success in a conflict is measured not by whether their particular viewpoint prevails, but by the clear identification of a viewpoint as a way forward.

    • Likely cause of conflict: Challenges to authority
    • Desired outcome: Closure or resolution
    • Deal with emotions by: Denying they exist
    • Others’ impression: Detached or aggressive adversary
    • Satisfied when: Conflict is over



    ESFJ

    FJs are likely to be viewed in conflict as needing and seeking harmony. They typically view conflict as a difficult or negative experience. Others typically see them as being warm and caring, and at times uncomfortable with the tension associated with conflict. For FJs, conflict tends to arise when their core beliefs or values are being challenged.  Their primary concern during conflict is the well-being of the relationships between those involved. At times this can lead them to ignore signals of conflict in the hope that it will go away or to brush conflict under the rug to avoid dealing with the painful issues that may come up.  Their rush to closure is likely motivated by a desire to make sure no one gets hurt rather than an objective assessment that everything is sorted out.

    • Likely cause of conflict: Challenges to beliefs
    • Desired outcome: Intact relationships
    • Deal with emotions by: Including them
    • Others’ impression: Seeker of communication and harmony
    • Satisfied when: There is no lingering bitterness



    INTP

    While aware of the emotions involved, they prefer to set these aside so as to allow a healthy and hearty debate. However, this may be done without due regard for others’ feelings, resulting in TPs’ being perceived as a catalyst or creator of conflict. Their attitude toward conflict fluctuates between seeing it as a waste of time and considering it a useful mechanism for working through issues. For them, success in a conflict is about seeking to clarify the situation. As a result, they often subsequently review and analyze matters.

    • Likely cause of conflict: Challenges to trust
    • Desired outcome: Defined process or progression
    • Deal with emotions by: Excluding them
    • Others’ impression: Catalyst of or contributor to conflict
    • Satisfied when: The outcome can subsequently be analyzed

    INTJ

    likely to be viewed in conflict as being rational, offering critical commentary and demonstrating a keen ability to make decisions based on the information at hand. Others typically see them as cool-headed, analytical, and clear thinking. For TJs, conflict tends to arise around authority issues. Questioning of hierarchy, reporting lines, seniority, and decision-making roles can be a red flag for them. When they are involved in a conflict, their primary need is for closure or resolution—to have it over and done with.

    • Likely cause of conflict: Challenges to authority
    • Desired outcome: Closure or resolution
    • Deal with emotions by: Denying they exist
    • Others’ impression: Detached or aggressive adversary
    • Satisfied when: Conflict is over



    ENTP

    ’ENTP’s tolerance of conflict situations is higher than that of most people, don’t be surprised if they see conflict as a challenge or as healthy. They are likely to be viewed in conflict as being critical and prepared to question anything relating to the conflict or the people involved. Others typically see them as being comfortable playing the role of devil’s advocate or championing the underdog. For TPs, conflict tends to arise around issues of trust and personal credibility. Instances that challenge these concepts tend to be at the core of their conflicts. When involved in a conflict, they are driven to find a way to navigate through the issues.

    • Likely cause of conflict: Challenges to trust
    • Desired outcome: Defined process or progression
    • Deal with emotions by: Excluding them
    • Others’ impression: Catalyst of or contributor to conflict
    • Satisfied when: The outcome can subsequently be analyzed



    ENTJ

    Most ENTJs believe they are right and may be stubborn when confronting an alternate point of view. All will want a quick resolution, but don’t brush aside important matters solely to move on. Keep in mind that your objectivity will allow all to find a way out of a conflict but may not limit its underlying emotional impact. Encourage everyone to give time to listen to each viewpoint. Don’t interpret succinct responses as being abrupt or disrespectful. Remember that it will be difficult to create an environment in which it is safe to express emotions. ENTJs believe that once a conflict is over, it’s over, so don’t miss opportunities to say what you need to say.

    • Likely cause of conflict: Challenges to authority
    • Desired outcome: Closure or resolution
    • Deal with emotions by: Denying they exist
    • Others’ impression: Detached or aggressive adversary
    • Satisfied when: Conflict is over



    INFP

    In conflict situations, INFPs pay most attention to who is involved and on the needs being expressed and the values at stake. They tend to accept and appreciate the differences between people and the positions they hold. INFPs communicate in a tactful manner and are prepared to give and take when settling differences. Like others with a preference for Perceiving they tend to seek clarification and progress rather than an immediate solution. They focus on the present when describing the conflict and concern themselves primarily with the input from all perspectives. They experience satisfaction once the conflict is being addressed.

    • Likely cause of conflict: Challenges to values
    • Desired outcome: Respectful listening
    • Deal with emotions by: Accepting them
    • Others’ impression: Someone who includes others’ values and concerns
    • Satisfied when: There is open exploration

    INFJ

    Their primary concern during conflict is the well-being of the relationships between those involved. At times this can lead them to ignore signals of conflict in the hope that it will go away or to brush conflict under the rug to avoid dealing with the painful issues that may come up. Once engaged in a conflict, FJs can be intense and emotional and will encourage others to share their feelings and opinions in the hope that this will lead to a resolution. Typically they will equate success in a conflict with the relationships remaining intact and there being no lingering bitterness.

    • Likely cause of conflict: Challenges to beliefs
    • Desired outcome: Intact relationships
    • Deal with emotions by: Including them
    • Others’ impression: Seeker of communication and harmony
    • Satisfied when: There is no lingering bitterness



    ENFP

    In most situations, you endeavor to create a warm and caring environment in which everyone can thrive. Conflict is no different. You want everyone to have an opportunity to have his or her say in a comfortable and safe setting. Challenges to your values trigger conflict for you. When you believe that something or someone you care about is in danger, you will readily fight to defend it or him or her. Occasionally someone’s perceived overreaction to what you have said or done can spark a similar response in you and lead to a conflict situation. In addition, your frustration with bureaucracy or systems that inhibit your creativity or personal well-being can trigger conflict. May take things too personally and have difficulty being objective. May not be ready to move on when others are. May be satisfied with partial resolution of a conflict. May not accept that all conflicts can end amicably

    • Likely cause of conflict: Challenges to values
    • Desired outcome: Respectful listening
    • Deal with emotions by: Accepting them
    • Others’ impression: Someone who includes others’ values and concerns
    • Satisfied when: There is open exploration



    ENFJ

    ENFJs are likely to be viewed in conflict as needing and seeking harmony. Others typically see them as being warm and caring, and at times uncomfortable with the tension associated with conflict. For FJs, conflict tends to arise when their core beliefs or values are being challenged. Their primary concern during conflict is the well-being of the relationships between those involved.  Their rush to closure is likely motivated by a desire to make sure no one gets hurt rather than an objective assessment that everything is sorted out.  It is only after FJs are certain everyone’s concerns and feelings have been given attention that they can begin to look at other factors.

    • Likely cause of conflict: Challenges to beliefs
    • Desired outcome: Intact relationships
    • Deal with emotions by: Including them
    • Others’ impression: Seeker of communication and harmony
    • Satisfied when: There is no lingering bitterness



     

     

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  • article Reblogged Science

    Harvard Scientists REVERSE Aging in Mice. Humans Next…

    Video Published by:

    Harvard may have just discovered the real life fountain of youth. Cenk Uygur, Ana Kasparian, Hasan Piker, and Aida Rodriguez, hosts of The Young Turks, discuss. Tell us what you think in the comment section below. http://tytnetwork.com/go

    “Researchers have found a way to protect a mouse’s DNA from the damage that comes with aging, and they’re ready to test it in people.

    Dr. David Sinclair, from Harvard Medical School, and his colleagues reveal their new findings in the latest issue of Science. They focused on an intriguing compound with anti-aging properties called NAD+, short for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. It’s been known that younger mice had more of it than older mice and back in 2013, the researchers found that when they boosted the NAD+ levels in older mice, they looked, biologically, like much younger animals.

    In the latest paper, the scientists revealed new details on how NAD+ works to keep cells young. Sinclair put drops of NAD+ into the water of a group of mice, and within a couple of hours, their NAD+ levels started to rise. Within the first week, the scientists saw obvious age reversal in muscle and improvements in DNA repair. “We can’t tell the difference between the tissues from an old mouse that is two years old versus a young mouse that is three to four months old,” Sinclair says.”*

    Read more here: http://time.com/4711023/how-to-keep-y…

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  • article Psychology

    A Twisted Sense of Humor May Be A Sign of Intelligence

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    So here’s a joke:

    man walks into a rooftop bar and takes a seat next to another guy. “What are you drinking?” he asks the guy. “Magic beer,” he says. “Oh, yeah? What’s so magical about it?” Then he shows him: He swigs some beer, dives off the roof, flies around the building, then finally returns to his seat with a triumphant smile. “Amazing!” the man says. “Lemme try some of that!” The man grabs the beer. He downs it, leaps off the roof —and plummets 15 stories to the ground. The bartender shakes his head. “You know, you’re a real jerk when you’re drunk, Superman.”


    If that made you lol, then chances are you smart, you really smart…


    Matter fact… maybe you a genius.


    Why? Well according to a January 2017 study published in Cognitive processing Journal, individuals who enjoyed dark humor tested significantly higher on scales of verbal and non-verbal intelligence than those offended by off-color jokes. A research team led by Ulrike Willinger at the Medical University of Vienna gathered a sample comprised of 156 adults and recorded their responses to 12 dark humor cartoons taken from German cartoonist, Uli Stein’s “The Black Book“. Dark humor (also referred as gallows humor) is defined as being “a kind of humor that treats sinister subjects like death, disease, deformity, handicap or warfare with bitter amusement and presents such tragic, distressing or morbid topics in humorous terms.”

    The study rated participants across a number of variables including dark humor comprehension, dark humor preference, aggression, mood disruption, and verbal and non-verbal intelligence. For each cartoon, individuals were asked to rate on a 4-point scale the difficulty of understanding the joke, the vulgarity of it, the level of surprise by the punchline and how well it fit, the novelty of it, their interest in the subject matter, and the amount of pleasure they derived from it. The researchers found that the results pitted participants into 3 highly correlated groups.

    • Group 1: showed moderate black humor comprehension, moderate black humor preference, low aggressiveness, average verbal and non-verbal intelligence and low mood disturbance.
    • Group 2: showed moderate black humor comprehension, low black humor preference, high mood disturbance, average verbal and non-verbal intelligence, and high aggressiveness .
    • Group 3: showed high black humor comprehension and preference, high verbal and non-verbal intelligence, no mood disturbance and low aggressiveness.

    Researchers concluded that the cognitive and emotional complexities involved in processing dark humor allowed people of higher intelligence and calm temperament to better recognize and appreciate the comedy in otherwise upsetting and disturbing content matter. Higher intelligence also correlates with a better ability to use humor as a coping mechanism for dealing with trauma, tragedy and stress.

    Psychologists have long attributed a relationship between humor and intelligence and many theories assert the key concept behind humor is the recognition of incongruity. Humor itself has been described as the resolving of incongruities or a “reconciliation of paradox”. It is believed that much of the same right brain skills involved in problem solving are also required to process and understand jokes. Smarter people are able to process the morbid and disturbing contexts of dark humor without being put off by it and hence comprehend the meaning of the joke enough to enjoy it.

    Here are descriptions of the 12 cartoons used in the study. See if you find them humorous or not.

    Cartoon

    Situation

    Text

    1.

    Santa Claus, standing on a long, thin tail and having some drops of blood under and on both boots, has been giving Christmas presents to a penguin, a dog and a cat, standing in front of him. Having distributed a fish, a dog biscuit and a tuna tin to them, he still has a gift wrapped cheese left in his hands.

    Santa Claus: ‘And who put the cheese on his letter to me?’

    2.

    Death, impersonated by a skeleton in a hooded coat holding an hourglass and a sickle stands at the doorstep of a man’s apartment.

    The man: ‘I am sorry, we do not die at the front door.’

    3.

    Up on a veritable height a man stands at the outer windowsill of an apartment block. Having a noose laid around his neck and a fixed knife directed to his stomach he puts a gun against his head. Beside him on the sill lies an emptied bottle labelled as poison and an envelope. Inside the apartment are two police officers, one of them pointing at the man saying:

    ‘Hey – I know this guy from elementary school. I remember that we called him Eberhard, the efficient.’

    4.

    A man scratching his chin apparently out of confusion is clutching the receiver of a public phone box. The voice coming from the receiver says:

    ‘Here is the answering machine of the self-help association for Alzheimer patients. If you still remember your topic, please speak after the tone.’

    5.

    A general practitioner is explaining the result of a medical test to a couple with her being pregnant:

    ‘To begin with, here is the good news: Your child will always find a parking space.’

    6.

    Four men are standing high up on a bungee jumping platform. One of them is holding a rope fixed on the one end to the platform. The other end of the rope is tied around a leg prosthesis that is turned upside down. One of them is telling the others:

    ‘I didn’t examining his certificate of disability in all detail.’

    7.

    A group of surgeons in an operating theatre is in the middle of what looks like a heart surgery. Without a sign of warning the heart springs out of the patient’s body right into one of the surgeons’ faces. Another surgeon remarks:

    ‘That’s the most amazing case of tissue rejection I’ve ever seen!’

    8.

    In a morgue a physician is lifting a white cover sheet off a body with a woman standing beside him. The woman confirms:

    ‘Sure, that’s my husband – anyway, which washing powder did you use to get that so white?’

    9.

    Two women, apparently real chatterboxes, are having a chat over coffee.

    The first one: ‘He is crippled, she is crippled and what’s more they are going to have a baby.’

    The other one: ‘I do hope things straighten themselves out.’

    10.

    In an operating theatre a surgeon has one arm deep in an opened body. Another surgeon explains the situation to a man in a suit:

    ‘The autopsy is finished; he is only looking for his wrist watch.’

    11.

    A dentist is on a root canal job with the patient being completely tensed up due to pain. At the back of the patient’s chair the tip of a rotating dental drill, apparently having worked its way through the patient’s mouth and neck comes into sight. The dentist asks his patient:

    ‘Does it hurt?’

    12.

    After having committed suicide the body of a man hangs from a light fixture in a living room, hung by his tie. His wife enters the room with a friend and looking at him she complains:

    ‘And once again the green tie with the blue suit. Come on, what have I been nagging him about for all these years?’


    6 twisted jokes to make you LOLOLOL.


    Q: What’s white on the top and black on the bottom?




    A: Society.

    Q: What’s the difference between John Wayne and Jack Daniels?




    A: Jack Daniels is still killing Indians.

    Q: What’s the difference between a garbanzo bean and a chick pea?




    A: I wouldn’t pay 40 bucks to have a garbanzo bean on my face.

    Q: Who’s the opposite of Christopher Reeves?




    A: Christopher Walkin.

    Q: How many potatoes does it take to kill an Irishman?




    A: Zero.

    Q: What did Kermit the Frog say at Jim Henson’s funeral?




    A: Nothing.

     

    Willinger, U., Hergovich, A., Schmoeger, M., Deckert, M., Stoettner, S., Bunda, I., Witting, A., Seidler, M., Moser, R., Kacena, S. and Jaeckle, D., 2017. Cognitive and emotional demands of black humour processing: the role of intelligence, aggressiveness and mood. Cognitive processing, pp.1-9.

    Hauck, W.E. and Thomas, J.W., 1972. The relationship of humor to intelligence, creativity, and intentional and incidental learning. The journal of experimental education, 40(4), pp.52-55.

    Source: If You Laugh at These Dark Jokes, You’re Probably a Genius
    Source: Can Psychology Explain Humor?
    Source: Intelligence & Humor: Are Smarter People Funnier?
    Source: Cognitive and Emotional Demands of Dark Humor Processing: The Role of Intelligence, Aggressiveness and Mood
    S
    ource: If you have a dark sense of humor you might be more intelligent

     

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  • article Myers Briggs Reblogged

    How the MBTI Types Will Die | Tumblr

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    This post that is a little frighteningly accurate

    Life As An ENTP Girl | tumblr

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  • article ENTJ ENTP Myers Briggs Reblogged

    ENTJ vs. ENTP: What’s the Difference | High on MBTI 

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    https://highonmbti.tumblr.com/post/139521196600/how-can-i-tell-if-im-entj-or-entp

     

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  • article ENTP INTP Myers Briggs Reblogged

    ENTP vs. INTP: How To Tell Them Apart | High on MBTI

    Published by:

    https://highonmbti.tumblr.com/post/139835602995/ive-been-trying-to-figure-out-if-im-an-intp-or

    When listening to type descriptions, remember that “type portraits” can never accurately describe all people of a given type. Descriptions and portraits like these can only describe the types as they typically are.

    In ‘Psychological Types,’ Jung describes 8 main types, but does in practice refer to the dominant-auxiliary combinations popularized by later authors, such as van der Hoop, Pauli, Myers, and Briggs.

    INTPs are much more likely to look before they leap than ENTPs. ENTPs have inferior Si, which means that Ne’s exploration of possibilities and desire for novelty distracts the ENTP from accessing their personal historical database. This can cause ENTPs to be reckless and quick to abandon stability in favor of the unknown. INTPs on the other hand desire to understand everything and are more grounded in what’s known. This means INTPs are more likely than ENTPs to consider the logical consequences of impulsive activity.

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  • article mbti list Myers Briggs

    Little things that make each Myer Briggs type happy | Tumblr

    Published by:

    deviantart by the lake
    deviantart by the lake

    Around the lake
    by AlexandraSophie

    Sometimes it’s the small things that bring the most joy. Here is a list of the simple pleasures that each MBTI type is likely to appreciate .

    Continue reading

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  • article ENTJ mbti list Myers Briggs

    that entj bitch — The Worst Nightmare of Each Type | Tumblr

    Published by:

    The Worst Nightmare of Each Type

    INFJ – Realizing that the cause they have been supporting is run by treacherous and immoral people. Any good they’ve ever done in the world is instantly erased and turned into something harmful. Everyone they care for believes they are cruel and heartless.

    ENFJ – Everything they do continuously comes out wrong, and the more they try to fix it the worse it becomes. Every person they try to help somehow ends up worse off than before, and they are seen as the reason why everything is going wrong.

    INFP – Being trapped in a crowded room with morally bankrupt people, and having to coexist with them. Not being allowed to express their emotions, or process anything alone. Being forced to watch injustices and not being able to stop them or express how wrong they are. Continue reading

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  • article Psychology

    Susan Cain: The Power of Introverts | TED

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    In this TED presentation, Susan Cain, the author of “Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking” shares her experience as an introvert in a world dominated by extroverts. She makes the case for why introverts must be allowed to operate from their place of strength in both school and the workplace rather than being forced to be like extroverts. Susan discusses the value and struggle of being a introvert and why they should be supported and not sabotaged or forced to conform.

    Susan Cain is a former corporate lawyer and negotiations consultant — and a self-described introvert. At least one-third of the people we know are introverts, notes Cain in her book QUIET: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking. Although our culture undervalues them dramatically, introverts have made some of the great contributions to society — from Chopin’s nocturnes to the invention of the personal computer to Ghandi’s transformative leadership. Cain argues that we design our schools, workplaces and religious institutions for extroverts, and that this bias creates a waste of talent, energy and happiness. Based on intensive research in psychology and neurobiology and on prolific interviews, she also explains why introverts are capable of great love and great achievement, not in spite of their temperament — but because of them.

    In 2015 Susan Cain announced the launch of her mission-based organization Quiet Revolution that aims to change the lives of introverts by empowering them with the information, tools and resources they need to survive and thrive.

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  • article Myers Briggs Psychology

    Which Myers Briggs Type Is Most Likely To Be A Serial Killer?

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    [dropcap]T[/dropcap]he mystique of the serial killer is one that is both enthralling and horrifying. Scott A. Bonn, author of “Why We Love Serial Killers: The Curious Appeal of the World’s Most Savage Murderers” has explored the public’s odd fascination with these predatory monsters. In an article published on Psychology Today, he explains “The total disregard for life and the suffering of others exhibited by serial killers shocks our sense of humanity and makes us question our safety and security.” Continue reading

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  • article Strange

    Short horror story about a mad scientist

    Published by:

    A. James Harris-Dodder

    In most cases, much research is needed to understand that which we cannot explain. Years of study and long nights compiling information are a given. Luckily, that is not the case in this story. Parasites need no introduction to mankind. We drain the earth’s supply of life, just to maintain our exsistence. It was only a matter of time before it fought back with something no one could restrain.

    It’s necessary that I get to the point, as I may not be around much longer to document my findings. My name is doctor Carlive Greene, biologist, botanist, and master surgeon. I’ve become, through the years, am esteemed heart and brain surgeon, as well as having a knack for discovering new flora. I’ve traveled to South America, most of Europe, and the more civilized parts of Africa.

    This study began after my discovery of a new member of the Cuscuta, also known as Dodder, family.It’s a parasitic plant that attaches itself to the vascular system of others to feed. All previous members of the genus posed no threat to mammals, or any other “living” organism. All of that changed when I stumbled upon a new addition to the family. Villagers in a fairly civilized, rural African town were shocked beyond reason when their livestock began to die suddenly. I was asked to assess the situation, and my studies concluded that an unknown type of vine had become carnivorous and attack the animals.

    At first the locals, along with my colleagues, thought me mad for even suggesting such a preposterous idea. It took months of horribly irritating trips back and forth, with countless skeptical scientists, for them to realize I was right. I was asked to bring a specimen back to my laboratory to study, and that is where this experiment began. Through numerous tests, I discovered the cause of the plant’s sudden transformation. It’s environment severely changed when the natives began harvesting wood. One fateful day, one of the men working accidently caused a fire to spark, killing off the majority of the plant life. As the workers began the clean up process, many of them were injured due to their lack of modern technology. When their injuries occurred, their blood naturally fell to the ground, which is where the vine was introduced to it. Since this was the only source of nutrition it could find, it gradually evolved the ability to actively seek out other sources of blood.

    As my studies continued, it became increasingly apparent to me that I must cancel all of my other work. I became obsessed with this new oddity, studying it’s every action. I spent the majority of my funding purchasing animals for it to feed on. After a few months, my funds had run out, but I knew my studies had to continue. I began searching for new sources of blood for the plant.

    I knew a friend who owned a blood bank, him owning the one key to the facilities. I brought him to dinner, waiting patiently for him to use the restroom, before I drugged his drink. When he fell asleep in his car, I stole the key and raided the bank. This kept my specimen satisfied for quite awhile, but also forced me into seclusion. I was a wanted man, and I could not risk losing all I’d worked for.

    I was able to take a couple pints of blood from myself everyday for awhile, but it was obvious that this would not last. I began searching through adds online for people interested in casual sex. Since my lab was at least an hour away from any city, most people saw this as a great way to not get caught. I prepared three rooms specifically designed to hold them in. After weeks of careful planning, everything was ready. All three individuals were convinced they were attending an orgy, and I took extra steps to make sure my guests never suspected a thing once they arrived. I had two call girls to keep the charade going when they entered the lab.

    All they saw were fine curtains, expensive furniture, and priceless art, all being counterfeit versions I had ordered. As they made small talk with the girls, I released gas into the room, causing them to lose consciousness. I drug the girls off first, burying them in the dirt around the vines. It didn’t take long for them to be fully drained. After this, I brought each person to their respective room. My group consisted of very specifically chosen subjects: a husky American male, a lanky Asian male, and a female body builder from Kenya. Our first subject, the American male, died of a massive heart attack not long after waking. Once he fell lifelessly upon the ground, the Dodder attacked. It began to feed, but very quickly shriveled and died.

    Our next subject was the small framed Asian man. He fought hard to get out, which roused the plant, causing it to lunge towards him. After an hour had passed, all traces of the man had vanished, and the plant went back to resting. Which brings us to our final subject, the Kenyan woman. She managed to severely damage the glass through which I was observing. In doing so, she violently swung her arm upwards, smashing out the light fixture. I was unable to see anything for several minutes, only hearing screaming and rustling sounds. Once I was able to find a flashlight, I moved slowly towards the examining room. As I began to open the door, something rammed it, forcefully swinging it completely off the hinges. I scrambled backwards, frantically trying to regain my footing. As I did so, a vine twice the size of all of the others lunged towards me. I jumped far enough back to avoid it, and locked myself in the closest empty room.

    As I write this, I am still in that very room. Since I began writing this down, the vine has managed to shake all but one hinge from the door. I must hurry my conclusion, for soon I will be with all the rest who fell victim to this monstrosity. I have concluded, after all above stated tests and findings, that our species no longer reigns supreme. In a very short time, all of you will be in a room similar to this one, awaiting your demise, Live while you can, because man is no longer the dominant parasite. We have become the dominant prey.

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  • article INTP Myers Briggs

    6 Reasons Why INTPs Are So Damn Broke

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    bohemian intp
    [dropcap]T[/dropcap]here is research that has investigated the relationship between intelligence and income and found individuals with higher IQ test scores have higher income. Within the pantheon of Myers Briggs personalities, INTPs are pegged as being the most intellectually inclined. They rate the highest in I.Q. testing, they’re the most conceptual, and they’re analytical as well as highly creative and ingenious. They enjoy complexity and problem solving. Their strengths make them well suited for high paying careers including:

    • Computer Network Architect.
    • Computer Scientist.
    • Computer Programmer.
    • Computer Systems Analyst.
    • Database Administrator.
    • Information Security Analyst.
    • Network Administrator.
    • Software Developer.
    Continue reading

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  • article Myers Briggs Psychology

    Personality Traits of Successful Entrepreneurs

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    Among the 16 personality types defined in the Myers Briggs type indicator, 5 of them have been recognized to be highly correlated with success in business and entrepreneurial skillsets. Those types are ENTP, INTJ, ENTJ, ESTJ, ISTJ. These personalities feature the cognitive preferences that are most aligned with traits associated with high achievement and ambition. These types also rank the highest in earned income and each share the Thinking (T) preference. Thinking and judging appear to be the strongest factors involved in executive leadership ability. However, intuition (N) is  associated with the ability to envision possibilities and recognize opportunities which are quintessential traits to all successful entrepreneurs. Continue reading

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  • article list Psychology

    10 Bizarre Therapies in Mental Illness Treatment History

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    image via http://smatterist.com

    Lucky for us, we live in a time where medicine and science have made great strides in the development of effective treatments to diseases that were once fatal. Nowadays, many diseases and disorders are alleviated with pills, injections or ointments. Those that require surgical procedures are carried out with lower risk than ever before.

    In the past however, many of the treatments utilized by medical physicians were almost as harmful as the condition they were meant to cure. These procedures were often highly invasive and ineffective and many patients died as a result of them. Methods in the psychiatric field were particularly bizarre and often exhibited a cruel lack of regard for the mentally ill. Many unfortunate patients were left disfigured or had their personalities irreversibly altered as a result of the procedures undergone and the benefits were often nominal or nil. Here are some bizarre treatments that have been employed to treat mental illness in the past.

    10. Trephination

    via intelligentdental.com

    via intelligentdental.com

    Also known as trepanning, trephination was an ancient practice dating way back as early as the Mesolithic era. It was a procedure whereby a hole was bored into the skull of patients suffering from schizophrenia, epileptic seizures or migraines. It was believed that evil spirits thought to be responsible for abnormal behavior and mental disturbances could be released through the cranial opening. The surgery was achieved using augurs and saws and was likely painful due to the absence of modern anesthesia. The removed portion of bone was replaced shortly after but often healed with some distortion in the skull’s shape and contour.

     

    9. Fever Therapy

    image via wisegeek.com

    image via wisegeek.com

    It sounds counter-intuitive but one doctor found that the best weapon against a malady is another malady. In the late 1800s, fever therapy (also known as pyrotherapy) was all the rage after it successfully alleviated the symptoms of patients suffering from neurosyphilis also known as general paresis of the insane (GPI). The treatment was pioneered by Viennese psychiatrist Julius Wagner-Juaregg who won a Nobel Prize in 1927 for “curing” a patient’s syphilis-caused psychosis by artificially inducing them with fever. The treatment entailed the elevation of the patient’s body temperature by injecting them with malaria-infected blood taken from another person. At that time, blood groups were only recently discovered and little consideration was given to it when transfusing blood between patients. Many doctors began adopting this radical and seemingly effective treatment until Penicillin came along in the mid 1940s. In the 1930s, machines were developed that could reproduce the same thermogenic effects of fever therapy without subjecting patients to undue illness. Alternate forms of pyrotherapy employ the use of hot baths and electric blankets to raise temperature.

     

    8. Rotational Therapy

    image via allday.com

    image via allday.com

    Before Charles Darwin, there was his grandfather Erasmus Darwin. Erasmus was a physician, scientist and philosopher although he was reputedly not very good at any one of those things. He believed that sleep cured illness and therefore saw spinning around as an effective means of inducing therapeutic sleep. His idea was largely dismissed but was later employed by Dr. Benjamin Rush as a treatment for mental illness. Rush, who was one of the original signatories of the U.S. Declaration of Independence, believed that mental illness was a symptom of brain congestion and he held the notion that spinning around would dislodge brain mucous like a centrifuge and produce mental clarity. Of course, all that spinning just left them dizzy, dazed and confused.

     

    7.  Lobotomy

    image via http://www.imhm.org/

    image via http://www.imhm.org/

    The Lobotomy (also known as leucotomy) has been a controversial procedure from it’s very inception due to the disproportion of benefits and drawbacks. The procedure was pioneered by Portuguese neurologist António Egas Moniz who utilized it in the treatment of various psychoses and problematic behaviors. The procedure was conducted by inserting an ice pick through the eye sockets to scrape away portions of the brain’s pre-frontal cortex to disrupt neuro-circuitry associated with unwanted symptoms. While the operation appeared to improve patient’s symptoms, it also came at the expense of their intellect and personality. Some patients died as a result of the operation either due to post-surgery complications or suicide. Others were left a shell of their former selves with severe mental impairments and somatic disabilities such as loss of bowel control. In spite of this, Moniz’s work earned him a Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine  in 1949. In the U.S., nearly 19,000 people have been lobotomized before antipsychotic medication supplanted it.

     

    6. Bloodletting and Purging

    image via history.com

    image via history.com

    Although this treatment gained prominence in the Western world during the 1600s, it actually originated in ancient Greek medicine. The prominent Greek physician Claudius Galen regarded an imbalance of the humors as the source of poor health and physical malady. English physician Thomas Willis later used Galen’s work as a basis for his approach to treating mentally ill patients. He argued that “an internal biochemical relationship was responsible for mental disorders. He believed bleeding, purging, and even vomiting could help correct the humor imbalances and aid in healing physical and mental illness. In addition to mental illness, these treatments were also used to treat various other diseases like diabetes, asthma, cancer, cholera, and smallpox.

    5. Hydrotherapy

    image via www.exposingtruth.com

    image via www.exposingtruth.com

    During the early 20th century, water-based methods became popular in treating mental illness. It was favored due to it’s simplicity and effectiveness in treating patients with insomnia and manic depressive symptoms. Patients were subjected to methods such as cold plunges, being sprayed or hosed down with hot and cold water jets or being confined to prolonged baths that lasted from hours to several days interspersed with periodic bathroom breaks. Clinicians observed the therapeutic effects of varying temperatures on the body and it’s nervous system. It was believed that various properties of water could be used stimulate circulation and improve symptoms accompanying certain diseases.

    4. Mesmerism

    image via http://www.signature-reads.com

    image via http://www.signature-reads.com

    The term “mersmerize” comes from an Austrian physician named Franz Anton Mesmer. Mesmer believed that physical and mental illness were the result of magnetic imbalances in the body. He called these forces “animal magnetism” and was convinced that restoring it’s equilibrium would alleviate health problems. Mesmer administered iron medication to patients and then passed magnets over their body. He found that patients responded positively to his unconventional treatment and later he abandoned using the magnets altogether once he saw that he could achieve the same affects without them. What he did not realize however, was that his patients were only psychologically responding to the power of suggestion and the “belief” that his treatment was working. Mesmer’s methods were dismissed as a quackery by the medical community and he later moved to Paris where he continued to practice his therapy on large groups of people. His work paved the way to the development of hypnotism.

    3. Metrazol Shock Therapy

    image via cvltnation.com

    image via cvltnation.com

    In the 1930s, a pathologist named Ladislas von Meduna observed that patients who experienced epileptic seizures would afterward become calmer. This led him to test and see if the same effect could be achieved in patients suffering from schizophrenia. After experimenting with various drugs such as strychnine and absinthe, the physician eventually found metrazol to be an effective solution. Metrazol stimulated the respiratory and circulatory systems and triggered seizures. Clinical reports indicate that the treatment appeared to improve symptoms in nearly half of patients. However, many also suffered vertebral fractures, myocardial damage and pulmonary tuberculosis as a result of treatment. Researchers later realized the therapy was actually not all that effective and it was barred in 1982 by the FDA. This form of seizure therapy was a precursor to electric shocks and ECT.

    2. Tooth Extractions

    image via http://westmetrodental.com

    image via http://westmetrodental.com

    At the turn of the 20th century, the advancements in medicine generated an enthusiasm that may have led medical professionals to get a bit ahead of themselves. A New Jersey psychiatrist named Henry Cotton developed the idea that mental illnesses of all kinds were the result of untreated infections in other parts of the body. He introduced the practice of “surgical bacteriology” where he proceeded to remove body parts such as teeth, spleens, tonsils, ovaries and other organs believed to harbor infection. Due to the absence of antibiotics, many patients died ironically from post-operative infection. Cotton reported high success rates but it is believed that his results were skewed. In spite of the high fatality outcomes of his operations, he was still largely admired by the public and lauded for his work.

    1. Insulin Shock Therapy

    image via https://www.flickr.com/photos/mentalnurse/51294941

    image via https://www.flickr.com/photos/mentalnurse/51294941

    Insulin Shock therapy was used extensively throughout the 1940s and 50s as a treatment for Schizophrenia. The practice involved injecting insulin into patients to induce coma. This was done multiple times until symptoms appeared to go into remission. It was first introduced by Manfred Sakel, an Austrian-American psychiatrist who began using the treatment in low sub-coma doses to treat drug addicts and psychopaths. With Schizophrenics, heavier doses were administered 6 days a week over the course of 2 months to 2 years. Dosages were increased gradually up to 100-450 units and clinics that used the treatment employed their own protocols as there were no standardized guidelines in place. Complications caused by treatment included hypoglycemia, convulsions, restlessness, brain damage, obesity and death. By the 1970s, the use of Insulin Shock therapy had fallen out of vogue after it was debunked as ineffective and too dangerous.

     

    sources:

    Link: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/nash/filmmore/ps_ict.html

    Link: http://www.inquiriesjournal.com/articles/283/the-history-of-mental-illness-from-skull-drills-to-happy-pills

    Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3640229/

    Link: https://books.google.com/books?id=9EYuAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA121&lpg=PA121&dq=trephination+bone+replacement&source=bl&ots=Jdy0bA24Dr&sig=62_BijYIBKKQbymZ-UM1134un0w&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjNqcjX9-fRAhUC4CYKHYGWAEEQ6AEINTAE#v=onepage&q=trephination%20bone%20replacement&f=false

    Link: https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/10/the-tragic-sadistic-mental-illness-treatment-from-the-knick-is-real/381751/

    Link: http://www.fairfieldstatehospital.com/metrazol.html

    Link: https://www.lib.uwo.ca/archives/virtualexhibits/londonasylum/hydrotherapy.html

    Link: https://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2011/02/17/the-birth-of-the-mental-asylum/

    https://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2011/05/09/psychologys-history-of-being-mesmerized/

    Link: https://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2011/03/21/the-surprising-history-of-the-lobotomy/

    Link: http://www.everydayhealth.com/pictures/worst-mental-health-treatments-history/#03

    Link: https://www.improbable.com/airchives/paperair/volume20/v20i3/centrifuging%20mental%20patients.pdf

    Link: https://bashny.net/t/en/260586

    Link: http://www.cbsnews.com/pictures/19th-and-20th-century-psychiatry-22-rare-photos/21/

    Link: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/117/2/e320.full

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